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Discussion Starter #1
Is it known how long the model 1900 American Eagle Luger was produced? Did production overlap the 1906 American Eagle? and how long was the 1906 produced? Thank You...........EVR
 

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Revised to eliminate misinformation--DG

The Old Model Pistole Parabellum (DWM model 1900 Luger) began production with serial number 1 late in 1900--I have not been able to track down an actual date. It is equally difficult to date the beginning of American Eagle production. The first of the actual American Eagle series is sn 2002. The lowest number confirmed in the U.S. Test Eagle range is sn 6167; these guns were delivered in Oct. 1901. It is most likely that American Eagle production began near the end of 1900.

The actual 1900 series ended with the Bulgarian contract, approximately sn range 20000-21000, in late 1901 or early 1902.

The sn between 21000-25000 consist of the model 1902, the first Luger in 9mm; and Luger Carbines. The 1902 model is distinguished from the 1900 by its short frame and thin frame profile under the takedown lever, in front of the trigger guard; its 9mm caliber; and its distinctive "fat" barrel. This series was produced 1902-1906 and consisted of many models sent to other countries' armys for test purposes, and some sold into the commercial market. Many of these can be found with American Eagle marked receivers. (Many of the test 1902s are found with special barrels in .30 cal.)

It should be noted that the Carbines in this serial number range which collectors have designated "1902" all have Model 1900 frames, and are exclusively in .30 cal.

The New Model Parabellum (DWM 1906 Luger) was introduced in 1906 and supplanted Old Model production. Sn ranged from approximately 25060-69000, and production of the model appears to have ceased mid-1913. American Eagles are found in this range interspersed with 1906 Commercial Navy, Commercial, and Swiss Commercial; and 1908 Commercial models.

--Dwight
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Dwight. Interesting that the 1900 was only produced for a couple of years. What prompted my question was a mans name on the inside of one of the grips of my 1900 AE (#8773). It appears to be in india ink (?) and the old German style letters; the date is 8/16/03. Naturally I know nothing of this person nor if he was the original purchaser, I like to think that he was.............EVR
 

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EVR,

I find the short production span interesting too, as well as the fact that 1902 production was spread out over such a long time.

Consider: that just because model 1900 production ended by 1902, doesn't mean that the guns couldn't have been available for sale, new, on the retail market for somewhat longer. This might particularly be the case for a gun exported to the US. Does yours have GERMANY stamped on the front of the frame?

--Dwight
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dwight, yes it does,right under the serial number. The magazine bottom is plain, no marking at all. Other numbers are in the usual commercial positions. You would think it prudent for DWM to produce the 02 along with the 1900 in order to offer customers a choice of 9mm or 7.65mm. Thanks again for your help............EVR
 

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The 9mm Parabellum cartridge was created in 1902...the Luger adapted for this new cartridge, the "1902" Fat Barrel, followed shortly thereafter but almost certainly not before early. 1903. This Luger retained the dished toggles incorporating a toggle lock, a one piece spring extractor and a flat composite mainspring, so I guess technically it remains a Model 1900. And that configuration would persist until the introduction of the breech block with the improved pivoting extractor in the 1903/04 timeframe.
Ron
 

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just curious when did the 9mm become the standard caliber my 1900 ae is 7.65..:unsure:
Ron has given you a timeline but I wouldn't apply the word "standard" to the 9mm as many nations purchased the 7.65mm well after the 9mm came on the scene. The German Navy adopted the model 1904 in 9mm but until the German Army adopted it in 1908, it was anything but "standard". Even so, it took many years before enough nations adopted it to consider it as the favored issue cartridge. That's my opinion; others may think differently.
 
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