Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
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It's a 1914 Luger made by DWM. 7411a is the serial number. They used letters after each 10000 guns. 1-9999, 1a-9999a, and so on.

Sometime after WWI, this one was handed over to the police who added the sear safety (the bar pinned a over the side plate). The magazine was matched up by the police also.

VPS is a unit mark, probably for the Verstärkter Polizeischutz. The VPS was setup in 1937 and consisted of older men who could be called up for police duty in an emergency (like war for example). In 1940, it was renamed the Polizei-Reserve.

Does your barrel have any Eagle N or Eagle J markings? Your picture isn't very clear.
 

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While that interpretation would make sense from the letters, the late date of that organization (1937) speaks against that. Per decree by Himmler‘s office, all marking of police guns was to cease by mid-1936 (although exceptions are known).

Another option offered is „Verwaltungspolizei“ (administrative police) plus a city with S.
True, but the 1936 memo hardly meant there was a hard cutoff date for the practice. I don't find the Verwaltungspolizei explanation very persuasive either. Where are the other "V.P.X" markings? VPH? VPB? I have never seen one. They are all VPS, and that was definitely the abbreviation used for police reservists (VPS-Mann).

Most of these (well, most of the maybe 3 or 4 I have seen) show later Nazi era commercial proofing, which would probably suggest a connection of the marking to later Nazi issue also. Nothing definite of course, but the reserves is the best explanation that fits well with the currently known examples. I am always open to a better explanation though.
 

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If you could show an actual post-1936 produced police Luger with the V.P.S. marking, that would certainly bolster your case. If, on the other hand, it should be an early-1920s non-standard local stamping, the existence of other variations wouldn‘t be a compelling requirement.

In the meantime, I found some old discussions involving Don Maus and Klaus Schad’s opinion that it could mean “Verkehrs-Polizei Sachsen”, as well as “Verkehrs-Polizei-Schar Württemberg“, although on the latter one would expect the locality to be represented by a letter too. No indication where they got Württemberg.
45 year old reservists are not getting brand new guns. It's going to be the old stuff.

The Verkehrspolizei suggestion has the same problem as the Verwaltungspolizei: where are the other municipalities? Verkehrspolizei were in most larger cities. I also think it likely that the unit mark would probably be tied to the city (e.g., Verkehrpolizei Dresden), not the larger German state. Not saying it's wrong, but it has problems.
 

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VPS-Männer, being reservists, had regular jobs and were only training on the weekends or on their own free time. They were not on normal duty. So there may have not been many VPS marked weapons. My guess is these pistols were probably used for training or perhaps stored away in case VPS men were called up when Schupo were drafted or deployed in foreign countries. An educated guess, but still just a guess.

Unit marking the pistols likely ended in late 1936 or 1937 in accordance with Himmler's order. The earliest apparent mention of the VPS I can find is a circular (Rundschreiben) from the Ministry of the Interior dated 13 October 1936 on instructions for the VPS in case of war or tensions, so it seems the VPS may have been stood up sooner than 1937. There isn't much detailed info on the VPS, at least in English.
 
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