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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Friends:

After firing my 1915 Luger & 1918 Artillery Luger I was surprised to see the way the spent cases were formed!

What happens to spent cases from these Lugers is that from the mouth of the case rearwards .170", the case is necked down to an OD of .380". The rest of the case has an OD of .388". In other words, the case is necked down .008". My reloads are resized to an OD of .378" at the mouth of each case.

I looked in both chambers and they are both machined this way. I would guess this is to enhance accuracy as this eliminates any gases from escaping rearwards of the case while being fired. There is also no powder burn residue on spent cases as one normally finds of fired brass.

Has anyone else noticed this of their spent cases.

Regards,

George


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Good observation, George.

It is my understanding that recent-manufacture replacement barrels do not have this feature. In fact, if I am not mistaken, this is one way to identify the batch of fake 1914-type Navy Lugers which were produced somewhere in the MidWest in recent years. Perhaps someone else can comment on this.

Luke
 

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George,

Goertz goes into this at length. When Luger adapted the pistol from 7.65 (.30) cal. to 9mm, he realized that, compared with the previous bottle-neck case, there´d be a gas seal problem if the case rim didn´t meet up with the end of the chamber. He solved this by machining a step in the chamber which pressed the case to form a slight bottle neck (5mm from the case rim) - patented by G.L. 1910

From approx. 1942 on, Mauser omitted the chamber step to reduce production costs. Without the step, spent cases often have a noticeable carbon deposit. I´ve found that bullet speeds vary greatly without the step.

So you´re lucky to posess a good one!

Patrick

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dear Patrick:

Thank you so much for this information, I truly appreciate you taking your time to answer my question. I recognize the name Goertz in my reading but could you please advise in what written material did he write this so I can upgrade my Luger library. I own all the major books on Luger including Jan Stills. Problem is all are in storage as we prepare to build a new house and reside in a townhouse at present.

Regards,

George
 

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George,

Joachim Goertz tragically died last year. The second edition of his book "Die Pistole 08" came out in 2000 (Stocker Schmid, Switzerland) and a translation by the British collector Prof. Sturgess was announced in 2004 - but there´s been no further news of it yet. It´s bound to be a difficult job as much of the text quotes antiquated, official German.

Glad to have been of help.

Patrick
 

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Patrick,
Very interesting info....and I thought I knew everything :))). I have noticed that some "hot" rounds I've loaded with a 115gr. load don't blacken from blowback gas though. This is US brass which is a little softer and probably expands better with little memory!!

Dave
 
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