Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had a friend loan me a 1917 DWM Luger in order for me to try and clean it up a bit. It's been in his family for a good while, originally being aquired by his grandfather. I don't know the whole story in that regard.

It's picked up a fair amount of surface rust, but the action still seems in decent shape. The serial number is 944, followed by what looks like a short cursive 'L', or perhaps an 'E'. All serial numbers I could find match, including the firing pin. I was unable to find any serial numbers on the wooden grips, but perhaps I don't know where to look. The straw finish is apparent on various parts, although the exposed surfaces are discolored due to rust. The mark bridging the barrel and upper frame seems to match. The magazine release button and trigger plate lever are practically brown due to the rust in the hatching. It's stamped 1917 on top of the frame, and has four stamps on the right side of the frame. The three on the left are of uniform size, and the final one is larger, and looks to have a pair of arms or wings curved upwards. (I had a little difficulty making them out.)

The wooden-bottomed magazine is mismatched, numbered 9000-something, and bearing the '+' indicating an extra magazine. It's just as well, as the magazine spring tends to bow under pressure, only allowing the follower to travel about halfway down, and the sides are quite rusted.

I know pictures are desirable, but I didn't have much luck with my camera last night. I need better lighting before I can get detailed shots. Anyway, just starting a thread that I can hopefully come back to later with more info...

Dan
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,219 Posts
Hi Dan, Welcome to the forum. It sounds like you are sliding into the abyss. Be careful or you will be buying your own luger soon. Then it will be too late. ;)

Post some photos and you will get a thorough rundown on the piece.

Ron
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I've been interested in Lugers for a while, but the only one I've seen in a store wasn't for sale. Either the owner didn't want to sell it, or he hadn't decided on how much to ask. It wasn't hard to convince me to borrow this one. I had been bugging my friend for two or three years to do something with it before it completely rusted away...

Dan
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Allright -- I attempted to get at least a few pictures last night. They didn't turn out perfect, but I'll post two of the usable ones here. They're both of the right side of the pistol, with the light from two different angles:

Download Attachment: frame.jpg
295.92KB

Download Attachment: frame2.jpg
289.8KB

I'll try to get more with better lighting soon. I'm embarrassed at how rusted it appears, and that's after a light application of steel wool. I hope I'm not hurting the finish, but it wasn't a pristine specimen to start. Anyway, have a look...

Dan
 

· Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
Dan,
I see your pistol was made for export to the U.S. (the Germany Stamp). Remember never use Steel wool coarser than 0000 with light oil. Also, in restoring Antique Firearms, the careful use of a SHARP single edge razor blade held at a shallow angle will remove crusted rust. I say sharp because when the blade becomes nicked, it will scratch the finish. Good Luck!

Dave
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I had noticed the GERMANY stamp. I hadn't noticed anything like a unit stamp, and it lacks the additional 1920 mark that some pistols that stayed in Germany had, so I suppose there's a good chance that it's a commercial export? I wonder when it ended up in the States?

Dan
 

· Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
6,534 Posts
Stamped 1917 and "GERMANY" would indicate that it was a German Army pistol used during the first world war and subsequently returned to some commercial enterprise in Germany that exported it to the US in the 1920s. Given that it is an import of that period, I would ask if it is 9mm or .30 cal and is the barrel numbered to the weapon.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The barrel bears the same serial number as the rest of the pistol, and the mark bridging the receiver and the barrel appears to be from a single stroke. (This mark is known as the "witness mark," I believe?) I think it's 9mm, but I don't know for certain. Is there any way to tell apart from attempting to chamber a round? I could just compare barrels with any other 9mm weapon.

I'll get pictures of all of these areas tonight, hopefully.

Dan
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
16,738 Posts
You can take a 9mm cartridge, and from the front, see if the tip goes in. If it does, its 9mm, if not, then obviously 7.65 (30 luger).

You could take a picture of the barrel, from the front, although not 100% sure, we could rough guess it 9mm or 7.65mm

Ed
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I can sorta make out the 44 in the picture... It's pretty clear on the sideplate itself. Likewise, the 944 under the barrel is very apparent on the pistol in person, but not so much in the picture. Perhaps I needed a brighter point-source of light when taking the pictures to highlight the engravings.

Dan
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've heard the land-to-land term before, but to what physical location does it apply? Is the 'land' the opposing sides of the chamber, or perhaps the barrel?

Dan
 

· Gold Bullet Member 2012
Joined
·
6,169 Posts
Dan.. Inside the barrel you have lands and grooves. The measurement is between the lands in the barrel. I have always thought of it as what the bullet travels on as it goes down the barrel.........
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Aha. I've also heard the land and groove terms, but it didn't click. I apologize for my lack of familiarity. Anyway, thanks for the info.

Dan
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top