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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stopped into one of my favorite gun stores and spied this Luger:
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory

Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood

Musical instrument Air gun Trigger Gun accessory Wind instrument

Bicycle part Camera accessory Rim Cylinder Auto part

Hunting knife Nickel Gun accessory Metal Machine

Gas Engineering Auto part Metal Fashion accessory

Air gun Trigger Revolver Line Gun barrel


The bore is bright with good rifling and the action is tight. All numbers match right down to the firing pin. I think it may have issued to a police agency. I know just enough about Lugers to know I'm really ignorant. I'd appreciate any info you folks might have along with the approximate worth.

Thanks for your consideration.

Mike
 

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My understanding is that about 80% of the 1920 and 1921 DWM lugers ended up in police service during the 1920's. Nice looking pistol, and a matching police magazine is a plus. It has the sear safety and has been cut for the magazine safety (on the left side of the frame, just behind the sideplate). Most of the magazine safetys were removed because I believe they became problematic and interfered with the functioning of the pistol. Finding one with an installed magazine safety is difficult.

As it sits, I'd say a $1600-1700 pistol in this condition (assuming all the internals and grips match).
 

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The condition is pretty weird, as the finnish is off, and the grips were messed with.

NO army pistols had a sear nor mag safety like this one has both. The 1921's with the dove acceptance markings ln the right are my favorite.
How much were they asking?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The condition is pretty weird, as the finnish is off, and the grips were messed with.

NO army pistols had a sear nor mag safety like this one has both. The 1921's with the dove acceptance markings ln the right are my favorite.
How much were they asking?
$1500

Me being Luger ignorant, what's strange about the finish? Do you suspect it was refinished at some point?

Mike
 

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$1500

Me being Luger ignorant, what's strange about the finish? Do you suspect it was refinished at some point?

Mike
Splotchy/thin areas look like old touch ups, and some of the pitting is blued over. The color in the first pic looks off. Probably lighting tho. Couple other things I'll see if others mention.
At $1500 I would buy it. JB
 

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Many (I'll go on a limb and say most) lugers that went into police service were reworked in police armories after the Great War. This being a post-war gun, it is possible it has been reworked, but there are some telltale images that will help give a better answer.

One thing that makes it difficult to figure out is the white grease pencil in the stampings. They can hide evidence of refinish/rework. Also, the safety is covering up the 'Gesichert' stamping which left the factory white white paint. There are other ways of telling to be sure by looking at the internal parts.

To me it looks like a very typical police pistol of the era. Since most 1920-1921 DWM pistols went to the police, this would not be unusual for it to have been reworked. Remember, these pistols were in use for 17-18 more years after they were made before WW2 even started. Then you had 6 years of war after that, during which many policemen were directly involved in the war (read 'Ordinary Men, Reserve Police Battalion 101'). Rework can be seen in a number of ways, not just the exterior finish. Yours has three telltale signs of police use as it sits (the two safeties and the magazine).

$1500? Certainly. Find a good video and learn how to take it apart if you purchase it. Also, be careful with taking the grips off (the left hand one can chip rather easily if done incorrectly).
 

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I guess my monitor shows different than you guys. It has wavy lines on the upper that bother me. Of course it can be the lighting or even an angle.
I do like the 1921's tho.

Always remember that rework can be simply adding a numbered toggle pin, or a complete reblue.
The feeling among many collectors is that if it went to the police its a rework. Many times there was nothing done except a 9mm barrel taking the 7.65mm one off. However, if they had a sear safety, a large hole was put in the frame and later, some filled up and others not. If filled in with melted welding, I believe the frame would have to be reblued from the temperature of the work done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you, gentlemen, for helping me out. Your revelations about this piece are most helpful and it just makes me want to learn more about Lugers. I called my LGS and asked them to put the 1921 back in the safe and I'd see 'em right after Thanksgiving.

Daniel76, I did find a good YouTube vid on disassembling/assembling a Luger and it looks as easy or easier than my 1911s.

Mike
 

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I stopped into one of my favorite gun stores and spied this Luger:
View attachment 688131
View attachment 688132
View attachment 688133
View attachment 688134
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View attachment 688137

The bore is bright with good rifling and the action is tight. All numbers match right down to the firing pin. I think it may have issued to a police agency. I know just enough about Lugers to know I'm really ignorant. I'd appreciate any info you folks might have along with the approximate worth.

Thanks for your consideration.

Mike
Nice police pistol, I do agree with others that the top blueing looks "funny" but it might be the picture. Because your pistol serial number has no letter suffix it is in the first batch of 1921 Lugers, the first 10,000. I have a 1921 Commercial Luger, cal. 30. # 6157 I. Good find.
MJI-1198
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, I decided to field strip the Luger this morning. I followed Daniel76's advice and watched a couple of YouTube videos prior to taking on the task. I was surprised at the ease of the take-down:
Revolver Trigger Air gun Wood Gun barrel

Brown Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel

I saw a little rust and got to work with Kroil:
Wood Automotive exterior Gun accessory Metal Electric blue

It cleaned right up:
Sleeve Tool Hand tool Metal Fashion accessory

Blue Textile Sleeve Rectangle Denim

The pistol was really pretty clean, just dry, so I simply oil/greased the appropriate parts. I did replace the firing pin spring and noticed the pin itself was a WWII type. Otherwise, every other numbered part was matching. I suppose a firing pin replacement on a 101 year-old firearm isn't too bad. After reassembling the piece, I removed the grips in order to replace the recoil spring:
Trigger Air gun Wood Revolver Gun barrel

Gentlemen, that thing whipped my butt! I needed one more hand but, after some cussin', stomping and a little blood, I got it back together. I did a quick function test and, lo, that sucker worked! I did notice when I reinstalled the grips that the right side was a bit loose as it had a little back & forth movement it the top. I'm pretty sure the grips have dried out and shrunk over the last half century so I was wondering if a few coats of linseed oil on the inside of the grps might help. Your opinions would be much appreciated. Meanwhile, I think I'll order some replacement grips so I can fire it without risking damaging the originals. Y'all probably know some sources for grips so advice is welcomed!

Did I shoot it? Of course I did. I loaded the mag with some 124 grain ammo and took aim at a spent shotgun shell ten yards away. The first round hit about a half-an-inch over the shell and so I buried the front sight in the v-notch rear and nailed the 12 gauge round. Did it a couple more times, too, just to see if I lucked out the first time. I'm liking my first Luger! I really appreciate you guys helping an old guy out!

Mike
 
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