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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After correspondation with the Hungarian Army Museum I can answer the question (approximately) - thought I should post it in here too. They think it is Gendarmerie or Police District 6 with number 222 ("District" back then in German would be "Kreis" or "Kerület" in Hungarian - not sure if I properly translated to English though). The instructions do not specify if the bicycle batallions had own weapon markings, since they were either Infantry or "fast forces". If they had their own weapon markings, then this pistol would had been No. 222 of the 6th bicycle batallion (KP in that case would mean "KerékPáros").
 

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well.....Thats a new one to me! I never saw a unit mark on a 29M before period....I love it!....possibly a clue to determine if it was Gendarmerie/ police verses an infantry bicycle battalion is to look at the acceptance mark on the trigger guard. Reportedly, the 29M was only adopted by the military. not other armed forces like the gendarmerie or police. However, two known acceptance marks are observed. The Circle E, is thought to be a possible police acceptance. However, If it has the usual Hungarian shield acceptance on the trigger guard, along with this KP unit mark, I would vote for bicycle battalion or the KerékPáros. Have I said I love it yet? LOL......Congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After a second correspondance with the Hungarian Army Museum they are now very certain this marking is the stamp of the Police District 6, which between 1925 and 1945 was in Székesfehérvár - qite a large district. Additionally I got supplied pictures of two more 29M pistols with identical 6.KP.XXX stamps - interestingly these two are #11297 with 6.KP.176 and #11312 with 6.KP.191. For those who deduct the delta between the serials (as well as the KP-number), they will quickly notice that of these two not only the serial is exactly 15 digits apart, but also the KP number. Since mine is further apart it would indicate there were at least two blocks for those pistols.
 

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David......who am I to second guess the Hungarian Army Museum. BUT...have they given you the reason why or how it makes sense? The acceptance on the trigger-guard is now shown with your additional pics. That is a Military acceptance. While the K. could be representative of "Kerület' for police, but then what are they saying the "P" stands for? It would make more sense for it to be "KerékPáros" for the military bicycle battalion in my thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sam, I did not intend to be more knowledgeable on Hungarian side arms than they are, hence I basically quoted what they told me. If you read very precisely what I wrote I stated exactly what they told me, not did I say that I fully concur with that nor that I have reasons to doubt their answer. They though were very certain on the second mail and mentioned they spoke with someone very knowledgeable on Hungarian unit markings. Secondly, IMHO a Military Acceptance does not exclude an item to be of Police usage - at least that is what I know from other nations. The Polish PPK pistols issued with the Police in 1939 all carry the Military G2 acceptance stamp, despite being Police guns. As well did the Austrian Army the rework of M.95 rifles to S caliber for the Police and put their HV repair stamp on these rifles.
 
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