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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Friends:

I would like to ask for information as all my reference books are in storage.

I was at a local gun shop yesterday looking at a Steyr 1909. The owner was speaking with a customer when I arrived. Turned out he was the owner of the Steyr I was looking at. After speaking with this guy I wanted nothing to do with anything he owned! He was a know it all and wanted way to much for the Steyr.

In the case there was a Mauser Byf43 P38 in the g block. I did not note the serial number but it was in the g block. Turns out the guy that owned the Steyr also owned the P38. This guy is an expert on Mauser P38's due to the fact that he owned a $25.00 Walther book, or at least the fool though he was. He said that I needed to buy this Walther book so I would know what I was speaking about.

He said that with his vast knowledge of Mauser p38's there were 3 versions of the Mauser P38 in 1943 and had something to do with the Byf 43 code in the g block. I mentioned that I thought there were only 2 variations and had to due with the machining of the frame with the hump in the trigger pin. I suggested that perhaps he was referring to a Walther AC P38 and he said no, Mauser P38.

Then he started with a 1920 Artillery Luger and pulled out a book and showed me where it described 1920 Artillery's. I was surprised cause I thought they were only made from 1914-1918.

I would appreciate if someone could advise on this matter.

Regards,

George
 

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George no expert, but you are right. He could be a little right, as they "made" up lots of odd duck, including "fake" artilleries in the 1920's. But true war artillery's were made only in WW1.

From Jan Still's Axis pistols, there are subvariation 1 and subvariation 2, there is also some police, so maybe this blow-hard is half right, just using the wrong terminoology.

Although no expert, I DO have a byf 43 in the G block, and it is a subvariation 1 by the one book not in storage.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dear Ed:

Many thanks for getting back to me. My Mauser P38's are subvariation 1 is in the c block and my subvariation 2 is in the k block. I truly do not understand what this guy was referring to. Possibly he might have mistaken Walther for Mauser and how the AC were stacked when marked. What really threw me was he was so sure he was correct in what he was saying but could not say what the differences were and all this was based on a single Walther book that was around $20.00 or less, AMAZING!

So I understand, the WW1 Artilleries were made from 1914-1918 by Erfurt & DWM. Erfurt made only in 1914. So a 1920 dated Artillery is a rework from parts?

I sure am tempted to get all my Still books out of storage to brush up. However that would not be possible as the unit was packed by a moving company and I was amazed how much stuff they got in the unit, I would never be able to get it all back in!

Thanks again.

Regards,

George
 

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George, 1920 Commercial Artilleries are'nt very common, but do exist. And are usually spendy when they turn up. They were reworks, and according to Kenyon, some were new manufacture. Made for export. George Anderson just found one on GA,not long ago. I tried to get it, but he had already nailed it.
Ron
 

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Hello George,

On the 43 date BYF P.38, there are indeed 3 variations. As follows:

1st Var. 50 000 produced, A to F block, Early frame & Extractor cut
2nd Var. 88 000 produced, F to # 1124 Q block, Late frame & Ext.

3rd Var. 5 000 produced, SN # 1172 Q to 6469 Q, Mixed WaA's with final stamp being WaA 135 not E/135

Info & data from Orv ( P38 Forum )

The 3rd Variation BYF 43 is a rare pistol but is in the ``Q`` block.........I've been trying to locate one for about 3 years without success......

Hope this helps a bit....

MARC
 

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Marc, the third variation extends into the R-Block. Mine is 416r.

George, in addition to these variatins, there are transition variation between the first and second. Those which have early frames and late slides and those with late frames and early slides. These are found around the G-Block!
 
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There are at least two other variations of byf 43. During that year Mauser changed from their dusty blue finish to the more standard military blue finish. Then in addition to the byf 43 with the mixed waffenamts, the most rare variation is a byf 43 with all late waffenamts (E/WaA135 nor E/135). These are usually found in the p or q blocks (undoubtedly assembled in 1944). The r block is the latest one I've ever heard of.
 
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