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We do. In addition to the noun gift, the transitive verb gift has been around for sometime, contrary to some people's impression. Choosing gift over give makes the distinction that the item is a gift rather than something merely being transferred from one to another.


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According to the Oxford English Dictionary, at least as long ago as the 1600's.
Thanks Mike. I still don't like it!:p
Not to argue(much) but how can one "give" something that is not a gift? Well, I guess one can "give someone the flu"; but it is still a gift, just not appreciated.

Like so many anachronistic usages, seems "gift" has had a re-resurgence, in just the last few years.:(

Ah, now I see, Oxford- isn't that in England? Explans English English, but not southern English.:eek:
 

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A couple that I see quite frequently on the forum:
"alot" instead of "a lot"
"loose" instead of "lose"
 

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I agree with Don so I'm gifting you all these.
 

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Thanks Mike. I still don't like it!:p
Facts are our friends. Even if we don't always like them that much.
Not to argue(much) but how can one "give" something that is not a gift? Well, I guess one can "give someone the flu"; but it is still a gift, just not appreciated.
The vast majority of things we give aren't gifts. I can pick up your coat and give it to you. It's not a gift, you already own it.
If I buy you a new one for your birthday, I gift it to you. Big difference in meaning.
Like so many anachronistic usages, seems "gift" has had a re-resurgence, in just the last few years.:(

Ah, now I see, Oxford- isn't that in England? Explans English English, but not southern English.:eek:
Oxford publishes both English and American English versions.

One of my personal grammar peeves is the recent rapidly expanding practice of omitting "from" by saying "I graduated High School".
 

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True enough, but I still hate the use of "gift or to gift" as a verb.
Personally I prefer "giving gifts"; clear, un-ambiguous and not lazy.
"I was gifted x,y or z "or " I was gifted a gift for my birthday"; fact or not, the usage just makes me crazy.:cool:

And I totally agree, use "from" when needed.

PS-
I just checked my old dictionary, a "New Webster's Dictionary" from 1971; the only entry for "gift" is a noun.
"gifted" is an adjective.

So perhaps this "new" to me usage as a verb, transitive came after 1971. Co-incidentally the same year I graduated from college.
Now I have an excuse, I would have been laughed out of English class if I used a noun as a verb. ;)
 

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In Beijing here, we are actually very proud to use wrong characters and/or wrong grammars intentionally. Believe it or not, that's fashionable. Especially on internet.

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[Edit] not in English though. Skill has not reached the level to use wrong word and grammar in E on purpose but could express meaning clearly yet.
 

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Anthony, thanks for caring enough to post this correction. Literacy matters. It really does. Few people who make such errors realize how much their credibility suffers because of it.

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[Edit] not in English though. Skill has not reached the level to use wrong word and grammar in E on purpose but could express meaning clearly yet.
Really? What about the asinine expression "My bad" that has become nauseatingly common in recent years? And, no, it doesn't come from Shakespeare.
 

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True enough, but I still hate the use of "gift or to gift" as a verb.
Personally I prefer "giving gifts"; clear, un-ambiguous and not lazy.
"I was gifted x,y or z "or " I was gifted a gift for my birthday"; fact or not, the usage just makes me crazy.:cool:

And I totally agree, use "from" when needed.

PS-
I just checked my old dictionary, a "New Webster's Dictionary" from 1971; the only entry for "gift" is a noun.
"gifted" is an adjective.

So perhaps this "new" to me usage as a verb, transitive came after 1971. Co-incidentally the same year I graduated from college.
Now I have an excuse, I would have been laughed out of English class if I used a noun as a verb. ;)
Perhaps it's an abridged Dictionary? Both my 1970 Random House American College Dictionary and my 1983 Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary include gift as a verb. Before you complain that the Webster's is too new, the entry dates the earliest recorded usage as 1550.
 

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To return to some semblance of the original topic .…

Whilst on the train from Brussels to Bruges I fell into conversation with a young Flemish woman. As is often the case with educated Europeans, she spoke better English than I do. I confessed I was limited to English and an extremely poor example of high school German, although my travel oriented vocabulary allowed me to understand a decent amount of the Dutch train announcements. When asked she told me she spoke English, French, German, Spanish, Italian and, of course, Flemish.

So, to my European colleagues: Did I inadvertently insult her by saying the announcements were Dutch rather than Flemish?
 

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Discussion Starter #31
To return to some semblance of the original topic .…

Whilst on the train from Brussels to Bruges I fell into conversation with a young Flemish woman. As is often the case with educated Europeans, she spoke better English than I do. I confessed I was limited to English and an extremely poor example of high school German, although my travel oriented vocabulary allowed me to understand a decent amount of the Dutch train announcements. When asked she told me she spoke English, French, German, Spanish, Italian and, of course, Flemish.

So, to my European colleagues: Did I inadvertently insult her by saying the announcements were Dutch rather than Flemish?
Although I am not a European colleague, I can answer that you did not. Officially kids in school learn "Nederlands", what we call Dutch. It is the official language, yet Flemish is a typical Belgian version of Dutch (not a dialect).

You can compare it to U.S. and British English. Different but we understand each other.

On the other hand, a Dutch person may have been offended if you said that he/she spoke Flemish and would most likely correct you immediately.

I hope it is not too confusing.
Anthony
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Perhaps it's an abridged Dictionary? Both my 1970 Random House American College Dictionary and my 1983 Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary include gift as a verb. Before you complain that the Webster's is too new, the entry dates the earliest recorded usage as 1550.
I enjoy the origins of words, sayings, etc.

In the case of "gifting" we can thank our federal government. As far as I understand it, it was reintroduced in the federal tax code and made its way back in popular use.

Anthony
 

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Perhaps it's an abridged Dictionary? Both my 1970 Random House American College Dictionary and my 1983 Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary include gift as a verb. Before you complain that the Webster's is too new, the entry dates the earliest recorded usage as 1550.
Thanks Mike, the volume is only about 5" thick, so likely "abridged", though it does not say so.
Since it has no reference to the origin of the work or its early usage it must be incomplete.

Thanks Anthony,
I knew this "new-but old" usage had to come from somewhere - since for the first 60 years or so of my life I never hear anyone use
"gift" as a verb.
 

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I love to read. A lot. My library room walls in the house are covered, except for the door and window, with bookshelves from floor to ceiling. Real built-in oak shelves for books, not cheap shelves that sag under the weight of actual books. The library is stuffed. So much so that most of the books have another row behind them. My wife's sewing room, my computer/office room and the "reading" room all have more full bookcases. And there are many, many more down in the basement.

One of my favorite non-fiction authors is Winston Churchill. His five volume history of WWII is exhaustive, if somewhat self-serving at time. But, he said himself "history shall be kind to me, for I shall write it". Even more interesting to me, and germane to this topic, is his four volume History of the English Speaking Peoples. Readily available in most decent used book stores.

In reading Churchill, I always keep a supply of little paper tabs handy. At the end of a reading session, I can go back and look up all the words and phrases that are not often understandable to someone on this side of the pond.
He had a fabulous command of the English language, and a remarkable ability to turn a phrase.

If you haven't, read some of his works.

The Story of the Malakand Field Force is an interesting read today, telling the story of a British force in Afghanistan in the end of the 19th Century. Change a few words here and there to get rid of obvious anachronisms and you would think you are reading about the 21st century. Not much has changed.
 

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Change a few words here and there to get rid of obvious anachronisms and you would think you are reading about the 21st century. Not much has changed.
[/QUOTE]

Certainly not the natives.
 

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It's not just FNs that people describe incorrectly. I snapped this yesterday at the tea room at Jervaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire. My lady and I had to share a slice after the recent correspondence and it was delicious.

Mike 005.jpg
 

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In Oklahoma if you admit to going to a tea room for some Belgium cake they revoke your man-card ;) If you're like me you probably like eye-talian dressing on your salad too ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #39
It's not just FNs that people describe incorrectly. I snapped this yesterday at the tea room at Jervaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire. My lady and I had to share a slice after the recent correspondence and it was delicious.

Mike View attachment 251457
I hope that they were better at mixing ingredients than letters! This is particularly bad coming from the U.K.

Anthony
 

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I would also like to add that the city Liège has a grave accent on the first 'e', to be pronounced: lee-yeige (rhyming with beige). This differs from 'liege', or 'a feudal superior to whom loyalty and allegiance are due', pronounce 'leege'.
 
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