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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Historical photographs with Borchardt pistol are rare as hell, until recently, only two were known - those of Carl Peters and of an unknown Native American chief.
About 5 years ago another photo came up but it was only yesterday thatt I realized that it was mis-attributed and was able to find out who the real owner was.
In the process I found 6 more photos of him with his Borchardt.

Valodi (Valdimir) Goguadze (1880-1954) - Georgian revolutionary, commander of the Armed Train forces of the People's Guard of Georgian Democratic Republic.
(more about him - in Georgian Wiki: Google Translate )


 

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I like the armored train, wish they would have shown the locomotive.
Thanks for sharing.
Pat
 

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Thank you Eddie, those are great photos. The armored train is reminiscent of the one in "Doctor Zhivago'.
Norm
 

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Eddie,
Thanks for the locomotive picture. That looks like something you could pull the direction lever, set the throttle and pour the coal to. Small drivers to keep the center of gravity, low and plenty of armor.
Pat
 

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Great pictures!
I share your enthusiasm about the "in action" Borchardt pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One has to wonder what ever became of that Borchardt? Love those pictures!
Jim
I doubt we ll ever know the S/N. Given how attached to it he was, it probably ended up in France - either still with the family or in some private collection.
 

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WWI & earlier Lugers. German or any rust blued pistols.
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What year do you think these photos are from?
 

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Hopkins & Allen No 5 in .32 or .38 rimfire; that would be my guess. Sure looks similar to the No 5, but there were all sorts of knock off's made all throughout Europe, so could be any one of those. H&A #5 is itself a bit of a S&W knockoff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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Hopkins & Allen No 5 in .32 or .38 rimfire; that would be my guess. Sure looks similar to the No 5, but there were all sorts of knock off's made all throughout Europe, so could be any one of those. H&A #5 is itself a bit of a S&W knockoff.
Most likely, cheap Belgian or Spanish .32mm copies - in Georgia, and in the region, in general, revolvers without trigger guard retained their popularity because of the easy draw from horseback.
Generally, in the early 1900s, those would sell for 5-7 roubles, to be compared with roughly 12-15 for bulldogs and Velodogs, 20 for a Browning 1900, 25 for a Nagant, 30+ for Bergmann 1896, 40+ for a C96, Luger or Browning 1903. A Webley Fosbery would go for around 65 and Borchardt ot 1902 carbine - over 100...
 
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