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Why do some of these late war PP's have proofs and some don't. I looked at the sticky for serial number research and it appears to have no pattern I can see. Were the proofed ones government purchase and the unproofed ones private purchase? I would have thought all the late production would be for the government but I don't know. Just interested. Thanks in advance.
 

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Unproofed ones are often the ones found at the factory in 1945, incompletely assembled or assembled by factory workers for GIs, hence the moniker 'cigarette guns'. They were not proofed as there was no proof authority or reason for it at that time.
 

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Anything stamped with a E/C, E/F, E/L was police accepted, WaA/359 was military (and other branches) accepted. That out of the way, the varying acceptance stamps that are complete, or missing, on late PP, P.38, K98k, etc give collectors valuable insight into the production. It was anything but perfect! Some guns would be completed early and mostly consistent, others may have needed additional tooling and would get completed out of line. Some were fully stamped and still captured at the factory, some were nowhere near completion and then you have a mix of everything in between. By looking at the varying acceptance stamps we can gain visibility into this and what stage of the process they received the stamps.
 

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w10085,

There is a distinct difference between "proofing" and "acceptance".

Proofing: a test to determine or "prove" the structural strength of the gun under firing pressure.
Until the fall of the plant, (+/-), all PPs were proofed whether they were going to German authorities or for "commercial" sale.
The typical proof at this stage of manufacture was the eagle/N.

Guns found with no proofs were either in the limbo timeframe of the plant falling into Allied control or after the plant liberation.

The acceptance marks referenced in the above posts were applied when these already proofed guns were then being inspected and purchased by the various German organizations.

It is believed that guns bearing no acceptance marks were for "commercial" sale.
 
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