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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, an opportunity came up to trade my Colt 1903 for a Luger and I took it. I have always liked these guns but was never willing to pony up what I honestly think is an absurd amount of money for them, so never figured I'd manage to get my hands on one, but here it is.

I don't know much about these guns. The seller told me it was post WW2 made in 1946 but I saw a crown/N stamp and figured it must be Weimar or earlier. The '46' he saw was just the last two digits of the serial number stamped all over the gun. At one time it was neglected enough to pick up some pitting, then professionally cleaned/stripped to white... and then for some reason it was painted black. I stripped the black paint immediately as it was frankly unsightly and causing function issues, like the toggle not wanting to go fully into battery & needing a punch to work the takedown lever.

Everything on the gun is matching except for the grips, which are damaged and bear a different serial number. It is chambered in .30 Luger, with a 100mm barrel, and has a lug for a stock. There is a badly applied MADE IN GERMANY stamp on the right side of the frame.

That is all I know about the gun. My assumptions are that it is a commercial gun made in 1921 or 1922 with no remarkable history whatsoever and very low on the value scale, but if anyone can tell me anything for sure about it, it would be much appreciated.

I have attached some pictures. There is a little black paint remaining as I am using chemical strippers only for not wanting to round off sharp edges/markings.












Once I determine what the appropriate finish for this pistol is it will be professionally blued. For now it will stay heavily oiled.
 

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Hello and welcome!

The pistol is already professionally finished by master craftsmen in Germany back in the 1920’s-you are correct that it is a 1920’s commercial gun.

A re-blue would kill any collector value, but if you leave it in original finish you made out ahead on your trade unless the 1903 had any special provenance.

Best,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello and welcome!

The pistol is already professionally finished by master craftsmen in Germany back in the 1920’s-you are correct that it is a 1920’s commercial gun.

A re-blue would kill any collector value, but if you leave it in original finish you made out ahead on your trade unless the 1903 had any special provenance.

Best,
Thank you.

I know the black paint must have been modern because it was applied over rust pits and had filled in the DWM rollmark on the toggle to the point of illegibility, as well as several other crucial markings such as the safety. With the black paint removed, the gun is completely white underneath, with no signs of any bluing. Did any Lugers leave the factory like that (ie, in the white)? If not, the original finish had already been removed and I would think applying some finish to the bare steel would be the best move for the long life of the pistol.
 

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I once got a WW1 Luger from a flooded basement, a ball of rust. I wire brushed it down to white metal. Oiled it well and put it back together. It made a GREAT shooter! 10 years later it still is in the white. professionally blued will cost more than it would be worth..but that may please you so why not? OR..it looks pretty good now anyway. Does it shoot? Eventually you MAY want a better one..9MM collectable. Use the blue money for ammo or a down on a real beauty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I dunno if I can reliably get ammo for it but it seems like it should shoot fine, the barrel is in great shape. It does look pretty good in the white and I'm sure I won't have any trouble keeping it clean, I have a few other bare metal guns.
 

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I agree, keep on cleaning it and oiling it until it functions smoothly again.
Then, you should have a pretty good shooter class luger, which is really the best way to get familiar with them.
You get to go shoot it and not worry about damaging it.
.30 Luger is still available.
MidwayUSA.com has 5 boxes of Fiocchi brand in stock for $50 a box.

Then, find an aftermarket magazine (Mecgar is a good brand - they sell for $30-$45).
They have been a little scare this year, but they can be found.
The original magazine is not likely to work very well and it's very likely the wooden base will break.
 

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30 luger / aka 7.65mm luger is easy to get, you just have to look for it. Also use ammoseek.com

I would guess this is made in the mid 20's since it has an 'm' suffix

I know some British guns were coated with a black paint, but it sounds like yours was painted in the USA. The made in germany was applied to export guns to North America (it was a requirement from the USA).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
30 luger / aka 7.65mm luger is easy to get, you just have to look for it. Also use ammoseek.com

I would guess this is made in the mid 20's since it has an 'm' suffix

I know some British guns were coated with a black paint, but it sounds like yours was painted in the USA. The mad in germany was applied to export guns to North America (it was a requirement from the USA).
I have a couple of British guns (and bayonets) with the style of black paint that seems so common on them but this was definitely a modern kind of enamel paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
YES! Very amiss..Looks like a pin inserted & peened? Is there any evidence of it looking inside?
Nope... nothing shows through on the other side. To me it looks like a weld blob that was ground down, but it's hard to tell without a loupe, my eyes aren't very good.



The trigger is great though, very light and crisp.
 

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You may benefit from our FAQ document, which you can find by searching "FAQ PDF update".

Your Luger was made in 1923 or 1924. I have an Alphabet Commercial DWM in the M block that is very similar.

There is certainly something odd in the area of the safety and sear, and I would operate this pistol with great care. It's possible that someone was trying to modify it to cycle full auto, and that would, of course, violate NFA rules if it were true. It should be carefully inspected, and probably returned to standard parts in the sear and safety areas. You need to ensure that the disconnector on the front of the sear bar is still functioning properly and that the safety lever is still operating as a safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You may benefit from our FAQ document, which you can find by searching "FAQ PDF update".

Your Luger was made in 1923 or 1924. I have an Alphabet Commercial DWM in the M block that is very similar.

There is certainly something odd in the area of the safety and sear, and I would operate this pistol with great care. It's possible that someone was trying to modify it to cycle full auto, and that would, of course, violate NFA rules if it were true. It should be carefully inspected, and probably returned to standard parts in the sear and safety areas. You need to ensure that the disconnector on the front of the sear bar is still functioning properly and that the safety lever is still operating as a safety.
Everything is working correctly and I don't see any evidence that engagement surfaces were altered. The safety has not been messed with. I'm wondering if something was attached to the sear for some purpose and later cut off.
 
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