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Eric,
Is this a trick question?馃帯馃槜馃槞
Pat
 

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To me the date represented the date more or less. Who really knows the transition date from one year to the next.
Happy Hunting!
Peter
 
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This was Erfurt, I would expect most of this was followed through out service.

PISTOL 08 Markings (1910):
Instruction on Marking the Pistol 08, with an Attached Drawing. Berlin 1910.
(Vorschrift f眉r die Stempelung der Pistole 08 nebst einer Zeichmung. Berlin 1910).
With all amendments up to and including 1914.
(Source: Bayerisches Hauptstaatsarchiv, Abteilung IV Kriegsarchiv, Munchen, File AS. V. 73/13).
1. Barrel, finished: 3.2mm-high inspector's mark.
2. Front sight, milled: 2mm-high inspector's mark
3. Receiver, hardened: 3.2mm inspector's mark, plus the year of manufacture (3.2mm high, 9mm wide)
4. Ejector, hardened: 2mm-high inspector's mark
5. Sear bar, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
6. Breechblock, hardened: 3.2mm inspector's mark
7. Extractor, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark, plus "Geladen" on the left side
8. Firing pin, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
9. Firing-pin spring retainer, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
10.Front link, hardened: 3.2mm inspector's mark, plus the name of the manufacturer (size not specified)
11. Rear link, hardened: 3.2mm inspector's mark
12.Coupling link, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
13.Recoil lever, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
14.Recoil-spring bar, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
15.Frame, hardened: 3.2mm inspector's mark, plus "Gesichert" on the left side
15a. Hold-open latch: 2mm inspector's mark
16.Locking bolt, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
17.Trigger, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
18.Trigger lever, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
19.Side plate milled: 3.2mm inspector's mark
20.Magazine latch, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
21. Magazine, finished: 3.2mm inspector's mark
21a. Magazine fitted: 2.1mm inspector's mark
21b. Magazine, bottom piece: 3.2mm inspector's mark
22.Safety-bar, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
23.Safety lever, hardened: 2mm inspector's mark
24.Grips, finished: 4.2mm inspector's mark
25.Grip screws, hardened: 2.0mm inspector's mark
PISTOL FINISHED AS FOLLOWS:
26a Pistol ready for power-proof and shooting-in:
飩稡arrel: full pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稲eceiver: 3.2mm-high inspector's mark, plus the full pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稡reechblock: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稥xtractor: last two digits of the pistol number in l.5mm-high numerals.
飩稦iring pin: last two digits of the pistol number in 1.5mm-high numerals.
飩稦ront link: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稲ear link: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稨old-open latch: last two digits of the pistol number in 1.5mm-high numerals.
55
飩稵rigger: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稴ide plate: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals.
飩稵rigger lever: last two digits of the pistol number in 1.5mm-high numerals (Simsons are not numbered).
飩稴afety-bar: last two digits of the pistol number in 1.5mm-high numerals.
飩稴afety lever: last two digits of the pistol number in 1.5mm-high numerals.
飩稧rips: last two digits of the pistol number in 2.1mm-high numerals (Simsons have full serial number).
飩稡arrel and front sight: alter sight adjustment, a chisel mark, 3 to 4mm high, of equal length on both parts.
飩稡arrel and receiver: alter sight adjustment, a chisel mark, 3 to 4mm high, of equal length on both parts.
26b Pistol after power proofing:
飩稡arrel: a heraldic eagle, 3.2mm high and 2.9mm wide.
飩稲eceiver: a heraldic eagle, 3.2.mm high and 2.9mm wide.
飩稡reech block: a heraldic eagle, 3.2mm high and 2.9mm wide.
26c Pistol after shooting-in:
飩稲eceiver: 3.2mm-high inspector's mark.
飩稡arrel: the caliber (in mm), in 1.5mm-high numerals.
Right receiver proof marking is believed to have followed the Erfurt standard to the letter:
3 at the far left is the Receiver Hardened acceptance marking.
26a is after the pistol is ready for the power proof.
26c is after shooting in.
26b is after the power proofing.
 

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Now this is great information, but does a new years date start for a mfg. January 1st. or its it some other time in the year? I think l have seen it her in the states in other months then January (had something to do with inventory time.
Happy Hunting!
Peter
 

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This is only an educated guess but with the manufacturing process being what it is/was, I strongly suspect that there was carryover from one year into the next. As an example, receivers stamped 1916 were still being assembled into complete pistols in early 1917. It's not unusual for manufacturers to complete a run of items after a target date or use remaining parts later than anticipated.
 

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This is only an educated guess but with the manufacturing process being what it is/was, I strongly suspect that there was carryover from one year into the next. As an example, receivers stamped 1916 were still being assembled into complete pistols in early 1917. It's not unusual for manufacturers to complete a run of items after a target date or use remaining parts later than anticipated.
+1 on this. I don鈥檛 know about Lugers specifically, but this can be observed on other firearms that have an acceptance date/mark and specifically on US military rifles that have a receiver date a month off etc from the barrel date
 

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Date stamps on Imperial-era P08s represented calendar year of manufacture. In 1910 the army published a prescriptive document for various markings of P08s, in detail down to the minutia of exactly where stamps were to be applied and their sizes. The receiver dare was specific to the year of manufacture. If the pistol was not completed by that date, further stamping was required to declare the date of completion. This was specified to be the addition of a vertical deliniator--not a slash--followed by the completion year, e.g. 1917|18 receiver manufactured 1917, pistol completed 1918 (the completion dare was specified to be a smaller stamp size).

--Dwight

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Date stamps on Imperial-era P08s represented calendar year of manufacture. In 1910 the army published a prescriptive document for various markings of P08s, in detail down to the minutia of exactly where stamps were to be applied and their sizes. The receiver dare was specific to the year of manufacture. If the pistol was not completed by that date, further stamping was required to declare the date of completion. This was specified to be the addition of a vertical deliniator--not a slash--followed by the completion year, e.g. 1917|18 receiver manufactured 1917, pistol completed 1918 (the completion dare was specified to be a smaller stamp size).

--Dwight

View attachment 656876
Are there known examples of Imperial DWM Lugers marked in the above manner? The military documents, as you say, are very specific on how a gun completed in a year other than the date stamp shows is to be marked and I'm sure Erfurt followed the directives to the letter. BUT, DWM being a private contractor didn't always follow the military directives explicitly. Case in point, it's known that the 1916 military directive to notch all receivers for use as Artillery Lugers was not followed by DWM. They only notched those receivers destined to be used for Artillery model production. If there are know examples of DWM Lugers date stamped as your illustration then they apparently did but all of the examples in Gortz & Sturgess are Erfurts.

Not trying to be argumentative; just looking for clarification.
 

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The short answer to your question is, I don't know.

The longer answer is SPECULATION that the 1910 marking instructions were specifically devised by the Imperial army to tell Erfurt, an Imperial rifle factory, how to make P08s once the rights were transferred to them to do so; that the instructions were never intended to apply to DWM, and could not actually have done so without revising DWM's contract.

SPECULATION again, that Erfurt manufactured all the P08 spare parts for the army, so the artillery notch became standard throughout production to avoid the necessity of maintaining separate production and distribution streams.

--Dwight
 

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The short answer to your question is, I don't know.

The longer answer is SPECULATION that the 1910 marking instructions were specifically devised by the Imperial army to tell Erfurt, an Imperial rifle factory, how to make P08s once the rights were transferred to them to do so; that the instructions were never intended to apply to DWM, and could not actually have done so without revising DWM's contract.

SPECULATION again, that Erfurt manufactured all the P08 spare parts for the army, so the artillery notch became standard throughout production to avoid the necessity of maintaining separate production and distribution streams. --Dwight
Dwight, that is a great answer and very logical. Thank you.
 
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