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quote:Originally posted by Dan Clemons
..... but I'm of the opinion that very few Lugers have their original blue.....

Dan
This observation needs claification. Without such, the most charitable comment that can be made in its regard is that it is misleading and imprecise.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Dan Clemons
..... but I'm of the opinion that very few Lugers have their original blue.....

Dan
This observation needs claification. Without such, the most charitable comment that can be made in its regard is that it is misleading and imprecise.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Dwight Gruber

In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
If a person ponders these observations, they make a great deal of sense.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Dwight Gruber

In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
If a person ponders these observations, they make a great deal of sense.
 

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Tracy: Your post is a bit confusing. You state that Navy pistols pictured in Still's, Imperial Lugers, are not marked with the last two digits of the serial number on the "sear safety". The term 'sear safety', as it relates to the P.08, was a safety device adopted by the Prussian Police in 1932 and are not found on any Imperial Navy pistol. The 1906 and earlier Navy variations were equipted with a grip safety and a lever safety. 1908 and later variations had but the lever safety. I believe that if you will review the pictures found in 'Imperial Lugers' you will find that the safety bar on the earlier Navy pistols will not exhibit numbers while the 1908 variations and later will.

Harry's Navy is a later model and should exhibit the last digits of the serial number on the safety bar.
 

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Tracy: Your post is a bit confusing. You state that Navy pistols pictured in Still's, Imperial Lugers, are not marked with the last two digits of the serial number on the "sear safety". The term 'sear safety', as it relates to the P.08, was a safety device adopted by the Prussian Police in 1932 and are not found on any Imperial Navy pistol. The 1906 and earlier Navy variations were equipted with a grip safety and a lever safety. 1908 and later variations had but the lever safety. I believe that if you will review the pictures found in 'Imperial Lugers' you will find that the safety bar on the earlier Navy pistols will not exhibit numbers while the 1908 variations and later will.

Harry's Navy is a later model and should exhibit the last digits of the serial number on the safety bar.
 

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Look at page 175, which pictures a 1908 Variation. The safety bar is up and exhibts the number '74'. The 1917 dated pistol shown on page 178 has a safety bar numbered '48'. FWIW, personal observations convince me that 1908 Variations and later should have the safety bars numbered, however, as with any aspect of life, there are exceptions to the rule.

Toggle pins were not required to be numbered until 1932. I cannot recall a reference addressing the numbering of hold opens on the Navy Models. Recollection tells me that they should be on the 1914 variations and not on the earlier variations.
 

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Look at page 175, which pictures a 1908 Variation. The safety bar is up and exhibts the number '74'. The 1917 dated pistol shown on page 178 has a safety bar numbered '48'. FWIW, personal observations convince me that 1908 Variations and later should have the safety bars numbered, however, as with any aspect of life, there are exceptions to the rule.

Toggle pins were not required to be numbered until 1932. I cannot recall a reference addressing the numbering of hold opens on the Navy Models. Recollection tells me that they should be on the 1914 variations and not on the earlier variations.
 

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Harry:

FWIW: My opinion, based on the photos, is that your Navy is a good one.

Am inclined to agree that the finish on the toggle pin doesn't look correct. It has been my experience that the finish should fire blue, i.e., similiar to that found on the breech block pin or the sear bar spring.
 

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Dave:

Nice looking 1917. There is no doubt that the side plate has been renumbered. In my opinion, the renumbering was not done at the factory. Who know when or where. Obviously, the person who did it was not attempting to conceal the fact from anyone.
 
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