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This is only a WAG/speculation on my part...

But with the multiple passes of the side plate through various and numerous cutting and milling operations, is it possible that the metal of the side plate becomes a bit heat-hardened and thus cannot take the bluing as well as other parts of a luger...

Maybe that is why some thought they saw a change/variation in the bluing of the side plate...?
 

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This is only a WAG/speculation on my part...

But with the multiple passes of the side plate through various and numerous cutting and milling operations, is it possible that the metal of the side plate becomes a bit heat-hardened and thus cannot take the bluing as well as other parts of a luger...

Maybe that is why some thought they saw a change/variation in the bluing of the side plate...?
 

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Pete, that would be one possibility, another is that the metal used to stamp out the side plate has slightly different metalurgical properties than that used for the reciever and barrel. Very slight variations in carbon and manganese content can strongly the rate of rusting when rust blung a part. When you have a time an extra rusting coat or two will even this out. (it could also indicate a little touch up on the sideplate but it is difficult to tell.) The tone changes can also be due to polishing grain directions and subsequent light reflection in a photograph. Since this color difference only shows up to my eye in the photo from the bottom of the gun where the correct serial number shows I would suppose it was a lighting/reflection artifact until some who actually saw it told me different.
 

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Pete, that would be one possibility, another is that the metal used to stamp out the side plate has slightly different metalurgical properties than that used for the reciever and barrel. Very slight variations in carbon and manganese content can strongly the rate of rusting when rust blung a part. When you have a time an extra rusting coat or two will even this out. (it could also indicate a little touch up on the sideplate but it is difficult to tell.) The tone changes can also be due to polishing grain directions and subsequent light reflection in a photograph. Since this color difference only shows up to my eye in the photo from the bottom of the gun where the correct serial number shows I would suppose it was a lighting/reflection artifact until some who actually saw it told me different.
 

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In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
 

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In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
 

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quote:Originally posted by Dwight Gruber

In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
If a person ponders these observations, they make a great deal of sense.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Dwight Gruber

In response to a question posed a while back on another forum, Ted Green, experienced Luger rebluer and restorer, noted that Luger barrels and sideplates "took" rust blue better--more quickly--than other parts of the gun. He noted that steel of the barrels, frames, and sideplates seem relatively softer than the steel of receivers, ejectors, extractors and breechblocks, and perhaps toggle links.

--Dwight
If a person ponders these observations, they make a great deal of sense.
 

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Note: edited to provide pictures with which to compare. Reproduction toggle is the top sample in the images, comparison is a 1917 Navy which appears to be authentic.

Note the sharp angle at the top front of the sight, and the vertical serrations do not go far enough down the movable sight piece. Ron has pointed out the difference in the overall profile of the top of the sight.
Download Attachment: i-1_B.jpg
38.3 KB
Download Attachment: Compare-i-6.jpg
135.98KB



Note the offset range numbers, also the difference in the style of the numbers themselves.
Download Attachment: Compare-i-2.jpg
145.42KB


Note the "swirl" machining marks on the bottom of the toggle--the original's marks go straight across. Also that there is no stamped letter on the reproduction
Download Attachment: Compare-i-4.jpg
167.96KB



Note the checkering differences on the toggle and the sight button, the reproduction has more lines per mm.
Download Attachment: Compare-i-5.jpg
147.99KB


Anyone who notes other distinctive features, please point them out.

--Dwight
 

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Note: edited to provide pictures with which to compare. Reproduction toggle is the top sample in the images, comparison is a 1917 Navy which appears to be authentic.

Note the sharp angle at the top front of the sight, and the vertical serrations do not go far enough down the movable sight piece. Ron has pointed out the difference in the overall profile of the top of the sight.
Download Attachment: i-1_B.jpg
38.3 KB
Download Attachment: Compare-i-6.jpg
135.98KB



Note the offset range numbers, also the difference in the style of the numbers themselves.
Download Attachment: Compare-i-2.jpg
145.42KB


Note the "swirl" machining marks on the bottom of the toggle--the original's marks go straight across. Also that there is no stamped letter on the reproduction
Download Attachment: Compare-i-4.jpg
167.96KB



Note the checkering differences on the toggle and the sight button, the reproduction has more lines per mm.
Download Attachment: Compare-i-5.jpg
147.99KB


Anyone who notes other distinctive features, please point them out.

--Dwight
 

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Dwight and Ron
Thanks very much for the Navy rear toggle link comparison. The rear toggle link on Harry's Luger appears to be correct. This information has been added to the post above.
Jan
 

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Dwight and Ron
Thanks very much for the Navy rear toggle link comparison. The rear toggle link on Harry's Luger appears to be correct. This information has been added to the post above.
Jan
 

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Jan,

I noticed in the "Imperial Lugers" that the sear safety is not marked with the last two digits of the serial number. In Harry's picture it's marked (38). Are the parts on military Navy's serial numbered like commercials?

Tracy
 

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Jan,

I noticed in the "Imperial Lugers" that the sear safety is not marked with the last two digits of the serial number. In Harry's picture it's marked (38). Are the parts on military Navy's serial numbered like commercials?

Tracy
 
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