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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the oppurtunity to get a Brazillian Contract , now the only marking that tells me it is is a "B" in a crcle on the slide, all matching, and in 70% + condition. Is the circl b what I need to loof for ? There are no other markings other than the toggle which if I remember is Mauser or erfurt . What should I look for and how much should I pay Thanks Guys.
 

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Melkor, be very careful, Brazilian "contract" Lugers were all made by DWM they would all have the circle B and extractor marked in Portugese. I believe that there is at least one perennial Brazilian on Gunbroker. Lacking a good reference book I would go there to get an idea of what they are supposed to look like.
 

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George has given you all the right answers. This picture shows the location of the circle B mark. The extractor marking is CARREGADA. Brazilian Lugers are difficult to find in good condition. If the 70% example you are looking at has good grips and only worn/faded finish with sharp corners and clear markings it probably is in the $850-$900 range, plus or minus. If it is heavily pitted or has been buffed down the price drops off sharply.

06 Brazilian.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes it looks just like the one pictured ,(not half as nice ) with the circle B, I will check the extractor.

Thanks, I will investigate further
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Melkor, I present you my Brazilian, S.N. 4.176. It does have a little circle around a "B" on the left side, the extractor bears the word "CARREGADA" (loaded in english) and no markings on the safety. All of them were DWM's for sure. There are no other markings to prove yours is a Brazilian one, as far as I concern. This one have all matching numbers and original barrel and wood grips.

Download Attachment: DWM.jpg
77.79 KB

Hey, Ron's is in much better shape than mine although this picture were taken before I clean it...
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pete, 1906 Lugers I have seen here in Brazil from the military 1908 contract (when Ambassador Floriano Peixoto and Col. Moreira César went to Germany in order to purchase license and tools for local production of Mauser M94 rifles), do not have any markings in the magazine, nor they holsters - some literature says they were numbered after the gun. I never saw this. But, perhaps all samples were carried non-factory holsters...
 

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I also have one of these Brazilian Lugers.
About 70%, but with some areas of pitting. The good news....it's never been buffed or messed with, and it's 100% matching.
My question.
How many of these were in the Brazilian contract?
Regards, Ned
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As far as I concern, Ned, around 5.000 P-06 in 7,65mm and (estimated) 500 P-06 in 9mm - those supposed to be destinated to higher rank officers - were ordered in 1908. You own a Brazilian contract Luger because in the early 70's Brazilian Army sold tho U.S.A. dealers most of the remaining samples in fair condition. Due to the fact that Brazilian contracts were so few, seems that they were produced as civilians, with the same amount of care with the finish and tolerances. The only item I have ever saw mismatched are the grips - often replaced due to wear and moisture.
You know, it is easier to find a good Brazilian contract Luger in U.S.A. than in Brazil... as you may have heard, the political agenda here is to ban any kind of gun fron civilian hands. Fortunately, we have won the referendum that pretended to ban guns AND ammunition. Sadly, NRA did not move a finger to help us... many Lugers - including WWII's were destroyed by anti-gun radicals.
Back to Lugers, it is usual that a Brazilian one bear some pitting. Since they were carried in several revolutions and conflicts, most of them frequently in highly hot areas - soldiers sweating, humid tropical wheather, sand and dust, poor manteinance... in the far country, still today we hear from people who lubricate guns with soy oil, animal grease, among other nightmares...
My Luger (7.65) - numbered 4.176 - is 80%, and is the best I have seen in Brazil. A mint one? Still dreamin about it.

Regards, Geraldo.
 

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Hi Geraldo,
thanks for the information.
My Luger definately has the "been there, done that" look. But I think it's a neat gun anyway.
I have 4 Parabellums:
a 1918 DWM, an Erfurt 1918/1920, a Finnish m/23 and the
7.65mm Brazilian.

What is the Brazilian contract pistol offically called in Brazil?

I was glad to see that the side of logic and reason won in your referendum. Regards, Ned
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Along with some other fellow collectors, Ned, I believe that a gun that shows her age is as desirable as a mint one. You might say "it's an old gun, and it was part of history" instead of "look - no one ever shoot it!". I can only dream of having 4 Lugers - I am happy for you!
As for the referendum, imagine that we had (I mean if you do not vote, you are going to be billed - it is not an option, like in U.S.A.) to say if we wanted to keep the right to buy a gun and it's ammo, or if guns and ammo should be outlawed. Of course they forgot to include the criminals in this "gun ban", so the people saw the government was trying to steal our right to self-defense (our Constitution garantee this right). But, for your information, Brazilian law only allow a citizen (over 25) to keep - at home - sixshooters in .22, .32 S&W and .38 Special; semi-autos in .25 ACP, .32 ACP and .380 ACP. Not even 9mm are alowwed.
As for how we call our Lugers, They are simply the "Lugers" or, most of the times, "Parabellums". Local old legends tells those guns could fire through a steel rail (those used in railroads)... they have a mystique very particular.

Geraldo.
 
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