Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
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Interesting! I have about seven pistols in my database in the 43,000 range and none have any test proofs or WaA marking except for one in the 43900 range that Charlie reported to me at one time. Your gun does not look like it has seen much action, unlike most of the guns that I have encountered with (later) added WaA markings or testproofs. I recently found out that the Belgian arsenals were treated in the same way as FN's warehouse. The captured guns were moved and not marked. It looks indeed like yours was most likely never issued to any Belgian officer or soldier. I am not sure why yours would have the test proof on the triggerguard.
Sorry that I am not more detailed.
Anthony V.
 

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quote:Originally posted by cpw




As a general rule, pre-war Hi-Powers had tangent sights & stock slot. Post war Hi-Powers were primarily fixed sights. As I mentioned this is the general rule.

Looking at the picture you posted and the serial number given, at first blush, I would be inclined to think that it is a post-war Hi-Power because of the fixed sights. The finish you indicated could be either pre-war or post war.

The pre-war Hi-Powers started at serial no. 1. But, when FN re-started production after the was, they also started at serial no. 1. (This does not include the contracts, of which many started at serial no. 1.) Consequently, it is possible to have two Hi-Powers with the same serial number, one is pre-war and the other is post-war.

But any general rule has its exceptions. There were fixed sight Hi-Powers manufactured before 1940. Not very many I would assume since production was geared to the Belgian military and the various foreign contracts. Argentina and Peru did receive contracts of Hi-Powers with fixed sights (which had special markings). Also, there were a few made for the commercial market. I have one that is numbered as serial no. 11202 (fixed sights but with a stock slot). There are a few other known examples, most in the 10/11 k serial number range. For referencfe. the serial numbers of the known commercial Hi-Powers have been recorded in Anthony's book.

So it is possible that the one you posted was pre-war.
This is a reply to the gun posted by Fritz and the posting made by Charlie; I just mention this so that things do not get too confusing.

I agree with Charlie; this gun looks like a postwar gun to me. This number would have fallen in the 1938 Belgian military contract (if it was prewar). I cannot make a definite determination without seeing/ holding it. I cannot say that it was made close to the Danish contract, as those had contractual numbers and not serial numbers.
In reference to the Peruvian contracts; I still have not found any fixed sight pistols that went to Peru before 1940. The presentation pistol in Steven's book (p.68) is obviously one of a kind and donated in 38 or 39. The picture next to it is a postwar contract however. I have seen one of these close to the number shown and it is clearly a postwar gun. You can clearly distinguish the differences in guns. Also the position to engrave the crest (close to the rear sight) was only standardized in the late 1940s, if not 1950.
Please let me know if you have any info on any prewar Peruvian pistols with fixed sights. Thanks
Anthony
 
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