Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Presented here is my recent addition which has some elements that puzzle me and hope to acquire some answers from our learned guests. This prize came from out of a long-time quiet collector's cache. The rig came complete together as you see it. I only assume it is correct as, I myself, have never seen another example of this holster before. It is of very high quality in both materials and craftsmanship. We have seen a number of RFV C96's before, but I am unaware of any holsters for these weapons. Because of the lack of any known marked examples, I have to assume that apparently they were all unmarked for the C96's, at least. All in all , a very stunning example of a canvas and leather holster whoever made it.

Download Attachment: DSC01998.jpg
137.49KB

Download Attachment: DSC01999.jpg
123.92KB

Download Attachment: DSC01997.jpg
172.26KB Unfortunately, the holster is entirely without any markings of any kind. The edging or welting is not of top grain cowhide but is made instead with suede leather. The box shaped pouch of approximately 1 and 5/8th inch wide by 2 and 1/2 inch high is completely unknown for its purpose, unless it was to store loose rounds of ammunition. The thought of retriving loose rounds from out of this pouch in a hasty moment is to give thought to a horrible nightmare.

Download Attachment: DSC01993.jpg
86.37KB

Download Attachment: DSC01996.jpg
74.08KB

Download Attachment: DSC02000.jpg
132.26KB The markings are engraved and are as any others found on RFV marked C96's.

Download Attachment: DSC01995.jpg
83.16KB What I am curious about is these markings and what they represent? Are the marks of WW1 era or of the Weimer Era? Are they military or do they reflect the usage by the RFV organization? The number 100 has been x'ed out by the use of a single slash mark across each individual numbers in the 100. The remaining set of numbers, 4.78. , are certainly of a different era/organization as they are upside down from the remaining set of numbers and are using a completely different format.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Although I did not show it, the grip straps of both the front and the rear show considerable use with the handling of this weapon. The dense walnut grips are polished very smooth by years of use by a hand wrapped around the grips. Had to be unholstered many a time in order to achive this characteristic.
 
G

·
RFV is the inventary stamp of the Reichsfinanzverwaltung (taxation administration of the Reich).
Every tax office had a cassa with cash money in these days, so also weapons had been delivered to secure this cash amount.
It is a typical marking of Weimarer Republik.

Interesting fact: at the end of Third Reich every weapon which was still in use at 1944/45 in these cassas had to be delievered to the Volkssturm!
 

·
Copper Bullet Member
Joined
·
524 Posts
I can't believe this post by John some 16 years ago still has active pictures to view. It begs the question, is there any other examples or information that has turned up over the years?
Thanks
William
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kudzu‘s Kid
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top