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Hi John, Very interesting 'pentagon' C/M variation with flared crown corners. As Joe's thread amply demonstrates, considerable variation is shown on various Marine item markings. Also, if I understand the nomenclature correctly, its rare to see FLAK sights probably used on the TK/SK 8.8cm AA guns of larger ships and shore installations.
(Not the famous 88mm of WW2.) Thanks for posting!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Ted and John,

Thank you for your wonderful photos/contributions to this thread. It's exciting to see more accessories, proofs, and to learn new information. A nice beginning to a new year!

Joe P.
 

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I see that no one has yet posted a C/M from a magazine pouch or holster, so here's my contribution. These C/M's were stamped on the nap side of the leather and are usually hard to see, and harder still to photograph. This is the clearest example I have, it's from a Type 1 Navy holster.
Regards, Norm

DSC_7946.jpg
 

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Hi Dick, some info about these sights. Both were made for “10.5cm” caliber guns, and barrel length designated by “L/45”= Kaliberlange 45, i.e. 45 x (caliber 10.5) or 4.725m., “U.Z.” for Unterseeboots-Zielfernrohr , and “C 6 “ or “C7” for Construktion model 1906 0r 1907. Early ones and really heavy, made to withstand underwater pressure.
B Regds, John
 

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Hi John, Thanks for the correction. The term 'FLAK' through me off, I assumed it referred to naval 8.8cm L35 AA guns. As we know, the 4.1" (10.5cm) gun equipped many small warships and later U-boats. Demand for more firepower led to use of the very heavy 5.9" (15cm) TK L45 gun on late-war U-boat cruisers to minimize use of the limited number of torpedos carried. Sounds like we both read Norman Friedman's 'Naval Firepower', the bible on naval guns & gunnery. Interesting sights & markings nevertheless!
Norm, Thanks for the rarely photographed holster C/M. Most can only be seen in strong diagonal lighting on the rough leather surface - if at all legible.
 

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Hi Dick
Well your FLAK connection is appropriate, as you know it stands for fliegerabwehrkanone. In discussions with Joachim Gortz, he speculated about why the need for antiaircraft guns as early as 1907, and thought that the Germans were thinking about aerial threat from dirigibles and balloons, and their potential for surveillance/shadowing rather than actual bombing.
B Regds, John
 

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My other hobby is woodworking. I just picked up a Kaiserliche Marine hand plane. I have lots and lots of planes, but couldn't resist one with an Imperial Navy property stamp.

image.jpg
 

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My other hobby is woodworking. I just picked up a Kaiserliche Marine hand plane. I have lots and lots of planes, but couldn't resist one with an Imperial Navy property stamp.

View attachment 191273
Mike,
great find- but where would such an item turn up? Europe?

I can't imagine one finding its way to the US with a returning GI.:confused:
 

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I came across it on the German eBay!
 

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Here are the C/M property stamp and the Imperial Navy firing proof crown from a 1906 Navy contract DWM Gew98.

Gew98 DWM 1906 (Marine) - 02.jpg Gew98 DWM 1906 (Marine) - 06 sm.jpg
 

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Crown/M on the spine of a 1906 SG1898nA bayonet.

SG1898nA-07.JPG

and the Crown/M on the spine and handguard of an SG1911 cutlass

SG_M1911_2.jpg DSC07937.JPG

Finally, the C/Ms from the steel throat and tip of the SG1911's scabbard

image1.jpg image2.jpg
 

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Here's a good one: The C/M from an Imperial Navy flag

Kaiserliche Marine Fahne.jpg
 
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