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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a brand new member, as you can see, and I've joined primarily because I found a great wealth of information here that can be very helpful with the Mauser C96. I try to do my homework in advance before pestering people with questions that may have been asked to death, particularly when they're questions that seem so obvious that they must have been covered. These are the two for which I cannot find definitive answers, in spite of being so basic: First, do all or most C96's come with the backstrap milled for shoulder stock, or is it only specific models? Second, does anyone know specifically what wood was used to make the stocks? The only genuine example I've ever held in my hands did not appear to be walnut, but I'm not a wood expert and I had no way to identify it.
 

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I have several late war stocks made from Beech wood. All the early stocks I see are made from walnut. I have oak stocks also.
Tim H.
 

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I'm a brand new member, as you can see, and I've joined primarily because I found a great wealth of information here that can be very helpful with the Mauser C96. I try to do my homework in advance before pestering people with questions that may have been asked to death, particularly when they're questions that seem so obvious that they must have been covered. These are the two for which I cannot find definitive answers, in spite of being so basic: First, do all or most C96's come with the backstrap milled for shoulder stock, or is it only specific models? Second, does anyone know specifically what wood was used to make the stocks? The only genuine example I've ever held in my hands did not appear to be walnut, but I'm not a wood expert and I had no way to identify it.
Did you just buy or are you considering? Happy to share thoughts as a recently-new owner of one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I've wanted one since childhood, probably after seeing "The Second-Best Secret Agent In The Whole Wide World" on TV reruns. Back when they were selling for busfare, I didn't act soon enough. Unfortunately, you will see from my header that I'm in a country which is about to close the door on legal handgun ownership. so my only collecting activities have been in the antique class (pre-1898) which is exempt, unregistered, and completely unrestricted. This really limits my options to a small supply of extremely high-demand pistols, priced accordingly (if you can even find one), so I'm weighing my options carefully.

What model were you fortunate enough to acquire, if I may ask?
 

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Canadian antique is one year ahead of the US antique - must be made before 1898 (no 1899). That was before the Turkish contract. Those very early cone hammers are hard to find. Most cone hammers were made in 1898 which are not counted as antique in Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Canadian antique is one year ahead of the US antique - must be made before 1898 (no 1899). That was before the Turkish contract. Those very early cone hammers are hard to find. Most cone hammers were made in 1898 which are not counted as antique in Canada.
I will quote an online friend of mine, who's ranted about this for some time now:

"I've seen two sold in Canada in as many years. The first was in good but not outstanding condition (bore unknown) It sold (rapidly) for $18,000. Ones only a couple of years newer (post-1898) but in far better condition sell for $4000-$6000, simply because they're not exempt antiques, so they're very difficult to buy and own here, and now at imminent risk of confiscation. Being registered, you can't easily or legally dodge the door-kickers, when the time comes.

The second one was a fine conehammer that was snapped up for $4000, because the idiot owner kept it registered and refused to listen to anyone who told him it was exempt, insisting that it was a restricted weapon. He did himself out of at least $10,000 by being a know-it-all ***. Hopefully the new owner knows the difference and moves quickly to get it de-registered and properly classified, but I fear it's going to be too late and it will eventually end up in the smelter.

There is a beautiful conehammer with matching stock for sale here right now, for $10,000. This is a pretty stiff price for a registered Mauser, but a bargain for a conehammer package in such outstanding condition. The stumbling block is that the owner kept it registered as a restricted firearm. When he died, his dim-bulb wife took it to the police and handed it over. It's now being sold directly from the police station, and they're certainly not going to co-operate with anyone who wants to get it de-registered. As the price is far too high for it as long as it's on the database, it will be hard to sell. It will require someone willing to make a big investment, act quicky, and potentially lose everything if they lower the hammer before he gets it re-classified. Sadly, I fear this one too is destined for the smelter."

This is the pistol of which he speaks, S/N just over #1700:

Air gun Trigger Revolver Gun barrel Wood
 
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