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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This 1939 S/42 came with capture papers, a holster, tool, but no magazine.
I paired it up with an unnumbered magazine.
A local veteran brought it home, and misplaced the magazine, to keep it away from his son in the 1950's, he forgot where he put it.
It came with his Arbeitzbuch.
Andy Gordon

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Andy
Interesting presentation and photographs. I assume that the local veteran fought on the German side. Any additional information about him? Please explain the Arbeitsbuch?
Jan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Knowing the man as I do, I talked about him, as if it was "his" arbeitzbuch", actually I meant the German soldiers he took it from, with the camera, I was in a rush to post pics. Sorry for the confusion, Andy
 

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Andy..... Very nice looking Luger. Think about posting the serial number with suffix. Perhaps somebody has one of the matching mags. You might also want to contact member Don Hallock about his "orphan mag list".

Hopefully the old gentleman will find where he hid the mag.
 

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I believe an "Arbeitsbuch" would be an employment record or authorization and quite probably would have no connection to a pistol. Perhaps the fellow brought the paperwork home simply as a curiosity.
 
G

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Hello,

Keoki7 is right it is a arbeitsbuch is a working book where he has done some work.
They had to show it when they are on the move from home to work or elsewhere

You can see on the 5 pic. On top :Biesherige beschaftigungsarten von langer dauer
This means: until now workings how are taking longer time: and than they write date (von- bis) from- until. And place where the guy has worked
Unfortunately I can not read the handwriting it’s too old writing
 
G

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Arbeitsbuch,

I forgot: this book has nothing to do with the gun.
I think also the vet took it as a relic
Also a soldier would have a soldbuch In there must be writen the gun number and type

wkr
Harrie
 

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Andy, the sad truth is that most WWII trophies were chosen from the town square where the surrendering Germans were required to dump them. Certainly some were in fact actually taken from an enemy, alive or dead, but most not. Also in the US military government situation in Germany after May 1945, G.I.s were not permitted to keep private or captured firearms. This was not Dodge City.

Despite what some of the old timers tell us, most of our Lugers were selected from an arms dump, secured by the local military authority, and then brought home when the guy had enough points. The Arbeitsbuch, by its very nature, has nothing to do with the pistol. None of this diminishes what you have...a very nice collection.

Also bare in mind that this is my opinion only and I may have no idea of what I am writing about.
 
G

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I hope I can help this "Arbeitsbuch" had nothing to do with the Luger.
The Name from the owner of this Arbeitsbuch was "Ernst Gronberger" he was born in "March 1. 1908" and he was "married" Verheiratet his occupation was a Salesman an he learn this in a "Bonbonfabrik" it's a Candyfactory
Every German had this book in this time he needs for the "Arbeitsamt" Job-Center.
This book had nothing to do with the "Soldbuch"
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Great! Now I can claim its Willie Wonka's! :)
I bet this was mated up by the veteran, to have another item to bring home.
I bet the "Candyman" never even saw the P08!?
Thanks for translation, Andy
 

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My father is a WWll veteran, 6th armored div. in europe from july of 44 until being severly wounded in Germany in March of 45. As a kid I used to ask him why he never brought a luger home for me (the fact that I was born 10 years after the war's end never dawned on me at the time) anyway here are his thoughts on vet bringbacks.
Actual combat troops did not pick up enemy trophies for two reasons. (1) they did not want to carry them, and had no place to store them, and during the war you could not mail them home. Remember even letters went by V-mail prior to wars end.
(2) The "word" among the troops was that if you were captured with a German pistol or other souveniors, you would be shot. (I am not saying that was true, just what they believed at the time.) He did say they were "rougher" with germans they captured carrying US Model 1911's, because they assumed that they had either killed the GI who owned it, or had robbed the dead.

As dad was in an armored infantry unit, their squad was assigned a halftrack for transport when the unit's tanks were on the move. During the infratry shortage in the winter of 44/45 they were often separated from the tanks and used as regular foot infantry.

In the latter part of Feb. 1945, German units started surrendering in entire unit formations. In one of these events, Dad noticed a very young kid who was wearing a belt and holster that was so new it was still shiny. Normal procedure was to have them drop all weapons, field gear and helmets, and then they were checked for any prohibited items. Because of the condition of the holster, the fact that they happened to be near their squads halftrack, and the general belief that the war would end any day, Dad decided to keep it. He told me the only mark on it was two initials scratched into the back of the holster, and that the kid had obviously been impressed with the importance of keeping his pistol clean, as it was well oiled, unloaded, and wrapped in a rag, and then stuffed into the holster. He put the luger with his pack, which was stored in the halftrack. He said they never carried packs when on foot, carrying rations in a mussette bag and or pockets.
Dad was hit by artillary and small arms fire some (3) weeks later while manning a forward listening point. Weeks later while in a hospital in England, he got a letter from another non-com in his squad telling him that he had his pack and personal items and that he would see to it that they were sent to him. Naturally none of these items ever turned up. Dad has choice words for those in both combat and support units, that made a habit of stealing from dead and wounded troops on both sides.
After spending almost two years in hospital on both sides of the Atlantic, dad did survive his wounds, although missing part of his right leg and right hand. Last Aug. dad celebrated his 89th. birthday and the following day was awarded the Bronze Star that he was authorized for action in the Battle of the Bulge in Dec. of 1944. The army apologized for the delay of 60 years, saying the paperwork had been misplaced.
 

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Runner, you are so right. My Dad fought the Japs; New Guinea, Philippines, and more. Rank of Major in 45 only trophy was a photo of a Jap officer, some of the Jap's stationary, the Jap's stamp collection (which was sent to FDR). Dad marked the back of the photo "he's a good Jap now" and sent it to my Mom.

Dad's four brothers fought in Europe (Dad was a Regular). Norm, an Infantry Lieutenant brought a bunch of loot home all collected after the Germans "threw in the towel". Sam was a bombadier on a B17, he brought his own lucky *** home without trophies. My uncle Dick was a sergeant in the combat engineers and brought home a single Browning .25 cal. automatic which he gave to my dad. Uncle Frank was a surgeon and brought no trophies home.

I was raised in a professional army family. From knowledge of my own family as well as that of most of my family's friends, I can assure you that most trophy taking was done in a well regulated manner when no shots were being fired. The guy who brought back a P38, Heer Dagger, SA Dagger and Nazi arm bands did not gather this stuff on the battlefield. Anyone whose been there can tell you guys in combat keep their heads down and cover their asses they don't collect souvenirs.

There were trophy hunters though but they were damn rare and probably crazy. I met a buddy of my Uncle Norm, a Major White. Major White relished battle and gloried in all the details of it well into his fading years. He was awarded at least three Purple Hearts.
 
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