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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I inherited a german drilling which Im have trouble ID'ing. Im a relative newbie to gun collecting so bear with me please. It is a double barrel 16g shotgun with a 7.7mm rifle barrel underneath. The 7.7mm seems to be an odd choice. It was made in Frankfurt am. The gunsmith was J.Jordan, whom I can find zero info on. I would gues that it is atleast pre-WWII but Im no expert on proofs and stamps. On the underside of the barrels. it has imperial eagles and also crowns with either the letter S, W or U underneath them. There is a Krupp Steal stamps on each barrel. Anyone have any info on this gun? I know its hard to help without a picture. Anyone know of any books on drillings or any where I could go to get more info? Any ideas what a drilling from a small time gunsmith is worth roughly? Thank for any help?
 

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Larry, drillings are cool guns. J.Jordan in Frankfurt am Main(assumed, it could be am Neckar) is probably a local small gunsmith I have never heard of him. Prior to WWII big companies like Sauer&Sohn, Geb Merkel, Krieghoff and others knocked out unimproved plain-Jane sporting guns without stocks. Little guys would buy them to be custom finished for their customers. Some of them are exceptional guns.

The sixteen gauge with the odd-ball rifle calibre is quite common for the pre war German market. The combination of 16 and 7.7 does not help its value here in the states where twelves are preferred. The value is further determined by the quality of the workmanship and components...grade of walnut, quality and degree of engraving, pop-up sights, ejectors, etc.

Check out www.drillinghotline.com that may help determine what you have.
 

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Hi,

Some info from a contemporary (pre-WW1 1913) source which might be interesting, as it describes the Krupp logo.

"The Steelworks Fr. Krupp A.G. in Essen, it's subsidiary in Annen is specifically equipped for Barrel steel production. The company supplies barrel steel for Infantry rifles and hunting rifles, as well as shotguns. For the last category a special steel is used which bears the company logo "Three interconnecting rings" and which can only be worked into barrels by the company J.P. Sauer & Sohn in Suhl. The other barrel steel is regrettably supplied without company logo."

"Die Gußstahlfabrik F r. Krupp A.G. - Essen, deren Zweigfabrik in Annen speziell für die Laufstahlfabrikation eingerichtet ist. Die Firma liefert Laufstäbe für Infanteriegewehre und Jagdbüchsen, sowie für Flinten. Für letztere wird ein Edelstahl von besonderer Güte hergestellt, der das Fabrikzeichen „drei ineinandergreifende Ringe" trägt und nur durch die Firma J. P. Sauer & Sohn-Suhl in
fertig gebohrten Läufen bezogen werden kann. Die übrigen Laufstahlsorten werden leider ohne Fabrikzeichen geliefert. "

--Moderne Gewehrfabrikation, Maretsch 1913.


Download Attachment: Krupp-logo.jpg
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow nice info...Thanks for the help guys!

Vlim, does that mean that there is no Krupp Stalh logo on any non-Sauer drillings, or that there is no 3-ring logo on non-Sauer guns? Mine has a Krupp Stahl logo but it doesnt have the trademark 3-ring Krupp logo.

I have another question. Would these be damascus steel barrels or could it handle modern ammo.

The 7.7mm is a bummer. I have a mauser in 7mm and a couple K98s in 8mm. Too bad it wasn't in one of those calibers. I do have an arisaka in 7.7mm but I highly doubt they take the same cartridge.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow nice info...Thanks for the help guys!

Vlim, does that mean that there is no Krupp Stalh logo on any non-Sauer drillings, or that there is no 3-ring logo on non-Sauer guns? Mine has a Krupp Stahl logo but it doesnt have the trademark 3-ring Krupp logo.

I have another question. The barrels are Nitro proofed, doesnt that mean they can handle modern 16g ammo?

The 7.7mm is a bummer. I have a mauser in 7mm and a couple K98s in 8mm. Too bad it wasn't in one of those calibers. I do have an arisaka in 7.7mm but I highly doubt they take the same cartridge.
 

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Hi,

As your gun is of a later date, it may just have a more recent Krupp logo and more than 1 company could work it. But your first remark is partially correct for early WW1-era guns. Krupp-delivered steel with 3 rings could only be worked by Sauer those days.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just figured out that the gun was made in October 1928.

It has Krupp logos on each barrel and it also says Krupp Laufstahl (Steal Barrel?) on each barrel.

I took some pictures today and will hopefully get them posted tomorrow.

Thanks!
 

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Hi,

Your assumption for Laufstahl is almost correct. 'Barrel steel' is a good translation.
 
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