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Discussion Starter #1
I have a DWM 30 Luger Serial number 288, matching numbers, wooden clip bottom, Crown N proof, Germany stamped on left side of chamber, but no markings on the top of the chamber. Anyone have further information of this era pistol?
 

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From your description you have a very early commercial Luger if there is no suffix letter on the frame under the serial number. The "Germany" stamp indicates that it was made for export to the US and typically the chamber top will be bare. If the crown/N is on it's side, it's pre-WW1 and if standing it's post-WW1. The serial number suggests pre-war.

Sharp, clear and detailed pictures will help to make the ID more positive.
 

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Your Luger is the most commonly encountered model of all Lugers. Give or take, it was made in the 1925/1926 time frame and known to collectors as an "alphabet" commercial Luger due to the letter "p" (not n) suffix. The "GERMANY" stamp indicates that it was made for export to the US.

While yours appears to be matching from what I can see and has the correct wood base magazine, it has been modified; the stock lug has been ground off. This likely dates to a misunderstanding about the 1934 National Firearms Act (NFA) that forbid attaching a stock to a Luger and similar guns. I once had one like yours with only part of the stock lug ground down so a stock wouldn't fit. People thought that if the gun could accept a stock that it was illegal. It wasn't and isn't.

Because they are seen more often than other models and most are in .30 caliber, they hold little interest for collectors. The good news is that they are very well made and are excellent shooters. If you shoot yours, I strongly suggest that you buy a Mec-Gar mag and keep the original mag for display only.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
IMG_2589.jpg

Thank you for the detailed information. Good to know. You are correct, the letter is P. I shoot it quite often. I enjoy shooting it and it always attracts attention at the range. It has never malfunctioned and I believe the trigger may have been tuned. Its very crisp and smooth, no slack, and the gun is pretty accurate given the poor Luger sights. This gun is my shooter. The other one (1937 S42 Rig) is my looker. I also have a 75 year Mauser anniversary model. Lugers are a unique item in the world of firearms and this website and experts like yourself contribute greatly to us owners.
 

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Well said Doubs !! Really spot on and well researched

Ed

Your Luger is the most commonly encountered model of all Lugers. Give or take, it was made in the 1925/1926 time frame and known to collectors as an "alphabet" commercial Luger due to the letter "p" (not n) suffix. The "GERMANY" stamp indicates that it was made for export to the US.

While yours appears to be matching from what I can see and has the correct wood base magazine, it has been modified; the stock lug has been ground off. This likely dates to a misunderstanding about the 1934 National Firearms Act (NFA) that forbid attaching a stock to a Luger and similar guns. I once had one like yours with only part of the stock lug ground down so a stock wouldn't fit. People thought that if the gun could accept a stock that it was illegal. It wasn't and isn't.

Because they are seen more often than other models and most are in .30 caliber, they hold little interest for collectors. The good news is that they are very well made and are excellent shooters. If you shoot yours, I strongly suggest that you buy a Mec-Gar mag and keep the original mag for display only.
 

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Thank you Ed. I can feel my hatband getting a little tighter. ;)
 
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