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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All!
This is my first post, so I'll begin it with a question that nobody seems to have an answer for....
All of my other Lugers (primarily Imperials, from 1914 to 1918) have a hold-open after the last shot.
My Finnish Luger (DWM 562XX) does not, nor was it ever machined to have one. My question is
why? Was this specified by the Finnish purchasing commission? It would make sense in some ways
as to prevent mud and snow from entering the action when locked open, which is when a Luger is at
its most vulnerable. However, there might be another reason. I sure would like to know!
As to the rest of the pistol, it has a 4" Tikka barrel and front sight, is "SA" marked, and has obviously
been re-arsenaled as there are few matching serial numbers on the parts.
I ask this question with begging-bowl in hand, as I know somebody out there knows the answer and
can help me become a little less dumb when it comes to my Finnish Luger!
Thanks in advance!!
ps) is there a good website for Finnish Luger info and history? Tx!
 

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pictures would help very much, to include serial number

early 1908's did not have a hold open
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Edward,
I should have included this pic as well~~ of it disassembled showing no provision for a hold open.
I hope this helps. Thank you! 20210404_212442.jpg
 

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From what I can see your Luger is made up of parts from several guns. The frame is 1913 or earlier as it lacks the stock lug. A 56,000 serial number places production in the commercial range approximately 1911/1912 which would explain the lack of a hold open. The receiver has a standing or vertical crown/n commercial proof making it post-WW1 and likely from an M23 DWM Luger made in the mid-1920's. The M23 Finnish Lugers were from the alphabet commercial run and marked in the commercial fashion. The locking bolt appears to have had a number stamped on it in the military style and the gun has been re-blued. I suspect that the frame has the original commercial serial number which has been applied to the receiver and replacement barrel.

The SA marking on the receiver shows that it saw service with the Finn military but the frame may or may not have as there's no way to tell when the upper half and lower half were mated.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow That nailed it pretty good! So what I have is a bit of a "mystery gun". I've read that the Finns would cannibalize
guns which were beyond repair and use them as parts baskets. No way of telling if that's true, but it seems logical.
But at least I now know the basics of what it is, but whoever/wherever patched it together has been lost to history.
Thank you very much!
 
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