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Hi all. So, I have wanted to join the Luger club since I was a little boy. Today at a gunshow
I finally got one. I paid $1,600 for it. It is a mismatch, having the serial number 6596 (or 96) on the barrel and reciever, as well as some other places, but 16 in two places on the toggle, and 12 on the magazine. It doesn't have any marking on the side plate nor any markings on the right side. In front of the toggle there is the marking 41, on the toggle it is marked S/42, and on the left side in front of the safety it is marked P.08. Now, I know what some of these things indicate, but just treat me like a newbie just to be safe. Any help figuring this thing out or even just comments would be appreciated.
 

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Welcome to the forum I can not give you any advice regarding you pistol, the pictures require more clarity. It will help if you take pictures in natural daylight for sure no flash and also avoid glare in the object. If you do a search on the forum I am sure you will find lot's of good advice.
Happy Hunting!
Peter
 

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What would you like to know about the luger? You note that it is a mismatch, meaning it has parts from multiple lugers. It seems to have main parts from a 1941 luger with some toggle parts from a luger of sometime between 1934 and 1940. The magazine might be a post-WW2 item and the "12" is not familiar as a magazine marking. The right grip in the last photo looks like a period walnut grip panel. I can't be sure about the left side grip panel due to the photo blur. Not much else to comment about. If the parts seem well-fitted, it might function as a pistol but a thorough inspection is advised. Do you have any questions? Congratulations on your new luger--they are fascinating and historic.
 

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Welcome to the forum I can not give you any advice regarding you pistol, the pictures require more clarity. It will help if you take pictures in natural daylight for sure no flash and also avoid glare in the object. If you do a search on the forum I am sure you will find lot's of good advice.
Happy Hunting!
Peter
Thank you and I am sorry about the quality of pictures. I am uploading better quality pictures now
 

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What would you like to know about the luger? You note that it is a mismatch, meaning it has parts from multiple lugers. It seems to have main parts from a 1941 luger with some toggle parts from a luger of sometime between 1934 and 1940. The magazine might be a post-WW2 item and the "12" is not familiar as a magazine marking. The right grip in the last photo looks like a period walnut grip panel. I can't be sure about the left side grip panel due to the photo blur. Not much else to comment about. If the parts seem well-fitted, it might function as a pistol but a thorough inspection is advised. Do you have any questions? Congratulations on your new luger--they are fascinating and historic.
Thank you, I would just like to know anything about it, any interesting tidbit. For example since i am not seeing a waffenamt stamp does this mean it is commercial? Before reading these replies i tested it out by shooting a magazine. It racked a round fine, cocked fine, shot fine, ejected fine, reracked fine, but didn't recock. I had to pull back on the toggle a tiny bit to get it to recock. This happened every shot. I know these things can be ammo sensitive so I asked a friend of mine and he said the Luger he shot did the exact same thing everytime he tried to shoot it with a non-steel cased bullet. I used Norma Range & Training 9mm 115gr brass cased FMJ rounds when testing. Alsp sorry about the photo quality, i didn't realize. Uploading better photos now.
 

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Here are new photos taken in natural light with no flash
 

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the sear plunger may have some old grease making it stick. A really thorough cleaning might do the trick. If it doesn't, you may need to disassemble it and clean the plunger. In any event, hang in there and there are lots of folks here willing to walk you through the troubleshooting and repair...Bill
 

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Thank you. I will do that. I only just joined but already this community has been very nice and helpful
 

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The circled part in the picture below is the sear pin or plunger that 2bnag is talking about. It is depressed by the L-arm inside of the side plate when the trigger is squeezed and causes the sear bar to flex releasing the firing pin. As the action cycles, the pin is captured and depressed by the L-arm as the receiver returns to battery. It is released when the trigger is allowed to go forward and is once again positioned under the L-arm to release the firing pin when the trigger is squeezed again.

There are three possibilities; the pin is frozen in place or the L-arm isn't releasing it after you fire a shot. The plunger should move freely in and out when you press it straight backwards into the sear bar. The third option is that the trigger doesn't move forward enough to move the L-arm enough to release the pin.

I once had a 1917 DWM Artillery Luger with a frozen pin. Like yours, after one shot, it wouldn't reset the firing pin. I soaked it in Liquid Wrench overnight and that freed it up. The Luger then worked perfectly.

In the second case, note that the edge of the L-arm that contacts the pin is beveled. With the magazine out and an empty chamber, hold the trigger all the way back and work the action. Slowly release the trigger and listen carefully. You should hear an audible "click" when the pin is released by the lever. If it doesn't release, it's likely that the bevel isn't correct. I had that exact problem on a mismatched Luger and a little file work (done carefully and checked often) took care of the problem. Note that the edge of the L-arm has enough flat to hold the pin in until the L-arm moves a little and then the bevel allows the pin to release.

If it's the third case and the trigger isn't moving forward enough to allow the L-arm to release the pin, you can increase the forward trigger travel by VERY CAREFULLY bending the trigger tab that contacts the inside front of the trigger guard and that will allow the trigger to move forward more and, in turn, allow the L-arm to move farther outward and release the pin. I caution you to bend it carefully and only a VERY SMALL amount... a few thousands is generally enough.

 

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The circled part in the picture below is the sear pin or plunger that 2bnag is talking about. It is depressed by the L-arm inside of the side plate when the trigger is squeezed and causes the sear bar to flex releasing the firing pin. As the action cycles, the pin is captured and depressed by the L-arm as the receiver returns to battery. It is released when the trigger is allowed to go forward and is once again positioned under the L-arm to release the firing pin when the trigger is squeezed again.

There are three possibilities; the pin is frozen in place or the L-arm isn't releasing it after you fire a shot. The plunger should move freely in and out when you press it straight backwards into the sear bar. The third option is that the trigger doesn't move forward enough to move the L-arm enough to release the pin.

I once had a 1917 DWM Artillery Luger with a frozen pin. Like yours, after one shot, it wouldn't reset the firing pin. I soaked it in Liquid Wrench overnight and that freed it up. The Luger then worked perfectly.

In the second case, note that the edge of the L-arm that contacts the pin is beveled. With the magazine out and an empty chamber, hold the trigger all the way back and work the action. Slowly release the trigger and listen carefully. You should hear an audible "click" when the pin is released by the lever. If it doesn't release, it's likely that the bevel isn't correct. I had that exact problem on a mismatched Luger and a little file work (done carefully and checked often) took care of the problem. Note that the edge of the L-arm has enough flat to hold the pin in until the L-arm moves a little and then the bevel allows the pin to release.

If it's the third case and the trigger isn't moving forward enough to allow the L-arm to release the pin, you can increase the forward trigger travel by VERY CAREFULLY bending the trigger tab that contacts the inside front of the trigger guard and that will allow the trigger to move forward more and, in turn, allow the L-arm to move farther outward and release the pin. I caution you to bend it carefully and only a VERY SMALL amount... a few thousands is generally enough.

Thank you very much for the information and advice. I havn't had time to work with it today, I am in college and school work is hitting hard right now, but when I have the free time I will pull this thread back up and go through all the information everyone has given me to try to get it to work.
 

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I can't see where you live, but $1600 is very high for a shooter - prices are different all over the USA / world.

And if you like it, then great. but I suggest you buy a couple books before you buy your next one.

Ed
 

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There were, in 1941, two waffenamts and a firing proof eagle on the right side of the chamber. If those are no longer present, and the photos don't show these, those markings were removed. It is possible these were filed off at some time but the photo of the right side has a flash that obscures the place where the markings would be.
 

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I can't see where you live, but $1600 is very high for a shooter - prices are different all over the USA / world.

And if you like it, then great. but I suggest you buy a couple books before you buy your next one.

Ed
I live in the United States, West Virginia. I was worried I was over paying for it. I should have tried to talk them down more, but I was excited and that got the better of me.
 

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There were, in 1941, two waffenamts and a firing proof eagle on the right side of the chamber. If those are no longer present, and the photos don't show these, those markings were removed. It is possible these were filed off at some time but the photo of the right side has a flash that obscures the place where the markings would be.
How is this?
 

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Welcome to the forum, and congratulations on your new Luger.

The prices of all firearms have recently risen considerably due to the unusual demand this year in the USA. Other nations have not see so much change.

You may find our Forum FAQ document useful.

 

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Welcome to the forum, and congratulations on your new Luger.

The prices of all firearms have recently risen considerably due to the unusual demand this year in the USA. Other nations have not see so much change.

You may find our Forum FAQ document useful.

Thank you and yes, thank you, i will check it out.
 
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