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I am in the market for a 90%+ condition FN 1922 rig. I need to purchase a book on FN so for now I am at a loss and would truly appreciate your assistance. I would appreciate what book is recommended for wartime FN firearms?

I would like to purchase a Nazi marked FN 1922 with black grips. Would really appreciate as to when these pistols were made and when the wood grips were used.

Thanks in advance you your help.

Regards,

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dear Charlie:

I know and agree 100%! I purchased all of Jan Still's books plus many others years ago! We are in the process of building a new home on our 27 acres and residing in an apartment and everything is in a storage unit!

It is for this reason I am looking for help!

Regards,

George
 
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George, Go to your favorite internet book dealer and request avails
on "The Belgian Browning Pistols 1889-1949 by Anthony Vanderlinden.
The work is a limited edition of 2000 copies and signed by the author
249 pages with a chapter on holsters; Lots of photos in black and white. Call me for details, Amigo! Skip
 

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Let me try and take a stab at your questions regarding your purchase of a WWII (wartime) German Nazi FN Browning M1922.

First of all, probably the best book on the subject currently is the Anthony Vanderlinden book "The Belgian Browning Pistols 1889-1949". There is quite a good section in this book on the very subject you are inquiring about.

There was a evolution of M1922 pistols once the German Army captured and took control of the Belgian FN plant. The early 1922s were part of the Dutch contract (Belgian proofs) and these early pistols are quite scarce. They are waffenamt accepted E/WaA613 (1940 to early 1941) and the overall quality is very high with superb fit and finish. The German occupiers used any available parts to continue pistol production and then started to produce parts they needed to complete/finish M1922s. This resulted in what you might call transitional or hybrid pistols the Germans using pre invasion parts still available and manufacturing parts needed post invasion to complete the M1922. For example, they ran out of barrels/slides and produced new ones with German military test proofs. These earlier pistols are found in both 7.65mm and 9mmK caliber. Most of these earlier pistols have black horn grips and some MAY have black Bakelite grips. Total production of these is around 6,500 as I recall.

The next short lived M1922 produced under German occupation (early to late 1941) are those that are E/WaA103 accepted. These still exhibit fairly high fit and finish. These are all in 7.65mm caliber and have primarily Bakelite grips. Around 36,000 produced in this waffenamt category.

The final category (late 1941--1944) the E/WaA140 waffenamt accepted pistols (all are in 7.65mm caliber) are the most frequently encountered and the most common--(there is also commercial E/N pistols non waffenamt pistols produced in this final phase of production). These pistol begin to show signs of war expedient production requirements resulting is less care given to the final fit and finish as compared with the earlier M1922s. The surface of the pistols are rougher and less polished (machining marks left unpolished is very typical along with less pronounced slide legends for example). This is where you will start to see wood grips along with black plastic grips (wood grips probably much more common). There was over 300,000 pistols produced in this WaA140 and E/N category. Serial range on these are 67000--155000 then complete "a" and "b" suffix range and around 41,000 into the "c" suffix range.

If you are looking for a representative pistol at the least cost then certainly the E/WaA140 waffenamt pistols are the way to go. Very nice almost new looking ones fully matched with a E/WaA140 accepted magazine are available in the $250--$300 range depending on what part of the country you live in. Full rig with spare magazine and holster can be had for $400--$500. Early WaA613 pistols can still be found at very reasonable prices if you look hard enough. I found one at SOS in February for $350 and it is in very high grade condition (95%+) with a hard to find E/WaA613 accepted magazine. These have yet to be fully appreciated/recognized (imho) and may represent one of the better collectible WWII military pistol investments currently available!

I have examples of most of these in my collection and I live out west. All of mine have been purchased from dealers/collectors east of the Mississippi. I don't think you will have any problem finding a WaA140 example or for that matter a WaA103 example if you look around.

Hope some of this helps and was what you were looking for! Sorry for being so long winded but I thought you could use some of this information considering you current situation. Best, Lloyd in Vegas
 

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quote:Originally posted by Lloyd in Vegas

Let me try and take a stab at your questions regarding your purchase of a WWII (wartime) German Nazi FN Browning M1922.

First of all, probably the best book on the subject currently is the Anthony Vanderlinden book "The Belgian Browning Pistols 1889-1949". There is quite a good section in this book on the very subject you are inquiring about.

There was a evolution of M1922 pistols once the German Army captured and took control of the Belgian FN plant. The early 1922s were part of the Dutch contract (Belgian proofs) and these early pistols are quite scarce. They are waffenamt accepted E/WaA613 (1940 to early 1941) and the overall quality is very high with superb fit and finish. The German occupiers used any available parts to continue pistol production and then started to produce parts they needed to complete/finish M1922s. This resulted in what you might call transitional or hybrid pistols the Germans using pre invasion parts still available and manufacturing parts needed post invasion to complete the M1922. For example, they ran out of barrels/slides and produced new ones with German military test proofs. These earlier pistols are found in both 7.65mm and 9mmK caliber. Most of these earlier pistols have black horn grips and some MAY have black Bakelite grips. Total production of these is around 6,500 as I recall.

The next short lived M1922 produced under German occupation (early to late 1941) are those that are E/WaA103 accepted. These still exhibit fairly high fit and finish. These are all in 7.65mm caliber and have primarily Bakelite grips. Around 36,000 produced in this waffenamt category.

The final category (late 1941--1944) the E/WaA140 waffenamt accepted pistols (all are in 7.65mm caliber) are the most frequently encountered and the most common--(there is also commercial E/N pistols non waffenamt pistols produced in this final phase of production). These pistol begin to show signs of war expedient production requirements resulting is less care given to the final fit and finish as compared with the earlier M1922s. The surface of the pistols are rougher and less polished (machining marks left unpolished is very typical along with less pronounced slide legends for example). This is where you will start to see wood grips along with black plastic grips (wood grips probably much more common). There was over 300,000 pistols produced in this WaA140 and E/N category. Serial range on these are 67000--155000 then complete "a" and "b" suffix range and around 41,000 into the "c" suffix range.

If you are looking for a representative pistol at the least cost then certainly the E/WaA140 waffenamt pistols are the way to go. Very nice almost new looking ones fully matched with a E/WaA140 accepted magazine are available in the $250--$300 range depending on what part of the country you live in. Full rig with spare magazine and holster can be had for $400--$500. Early WaA613 pistols can still be found at very reasonable prices if you look hard enough. I found one at SOS in February for $350 and it is in very high grade condition (95%+) with a hard to find E/WaA613 accepted magazine. These have yet to be fully appreciated/recognized (imho) and may represent one of the better collectible WWII military pistol investments currently available!

I have examples of most of these in my collection and I live out west. All of mine have been purchased from dealers/collectors east of the Mississippi. I don't think you will have any problem finding a WaA140 example or for that matter a WaA103 example if you look around.

Hope some of this helps and was what you were looking for! Sorry for being so long winded but I thought you could use some of this information considering you current situation. Best, Lloyd in Vegas
Thank you for the reference! I appreciate it!
 
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