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Gasser 11mm revolver

Hello George,
Your Gasser revolver with 240mm barrel (instead of 184mm) marked with crowned NI (Nikola I, ruler of Montenegro 1860-1918) is obviously not a common M1870/74 army type revolver but rather the famous Gasser's Montenegrin pattern. This was originaly introduced in the early 1870s but your specimen was made circa 1900. Special markings on cylinder and barrel are supposed to be Turkish property marks.
Cases can be easily made by reworking 7.62x54R Russian brass. Original lead bullets were 11.3mm diameter - .445 (according to an old Austrian Army manual), but a barrel I measured was 11.4mm groove diameter - .449, in which case I would be inclined to try a .451-452 lead bullet intended for .45 Colt.
Kind regards,
Jani
 

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gasser montenegrin revolver

Hello Thalis,
You have some interesting information I must say. The story that Pancho Villa bought 5,000+ Montenegrin revolvers is a new one for me; could you please tell the source for this information? Also, is the revolver that killed King George I preserved in some Greek museum?
Thank you and kind regards,
Jani
 

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Lionrobe,
Similar "Gasser Montenegrin" revolvers with colapsible shoulder stocks were offered by Manufrance of St. Etienne in the 1890s as "Revolver des garde-chasse". They were likely made in Liege.
With kind regards,
Jani
 

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Gasser revolver

This is one of the last Gasser 11mm revolvers, commercially proofed in Vienna in 1914. This small 5-shot Montenegrin version, a late derivative of the model 1870, is usually called Officers' Model. During WWI it was accepted by the Austrian Landwehr. The somewhat fuzzy unit marking seems to be 23 LSt R / 3, presumably 23rd Landsturm Regiment, weapon number 3. An interesting piece but not worth much due to missing parts.

With kind regards,
Jani
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The barrel does not look shortened to me, normal length for this model was 130mm. 1914 proof indicates production in same year. This specimen was made as a commercial Gasser's Montenegrin revolver just before WWI and acquired and pressed into service by the Landwehr due to shortage of standard handguns during the war.
With kind regards,
Jani
 
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