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Hello Taudelt,

I have some good news and I have some bad news. The good news is that the outline appears to resemble a 'GL', but it is slightly 'blurry'; the bad news is that magazines of 'GL' pistols and carbines were not hallmarked in my opinion. In addition to the two 'GL' Lugers which I own in my personal collection (you may visit my web site hereunder to preview those two pistols), I have examined a few other genuine pistols and presentation carbines which have the same pattern - no 'GL' hallmark on the magazine. My 1900 Swiss Acceptance Luger which has an unrelieved grip/frame and a flat button magazine (this was the the original magazine which was issued with the pistol), has no 'GL'. Furthermore, the magazine which is inserted in the 1898 Borchardt-Luger serial #5, is actually serial serial #10, has no 'GL'. Therefore, using a rule of consistency, I doubt magazines of 'GL' pistols were hallmarked. It is very possible that somebody will add a 'GL' to the wood base of an early magazine to inflate the price, or simply boost that they own a 'GL' pistol with a 'GL' magazine - to me it makes no difference as long as the magazine is correct in a 'GL' Luger.

Otherwise, you have a fine condition early magzine.

Albert
 

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Hello Albert,

On page 133 of John Walter's book, "The Luger Book", is shown a photograph of a "GL" marked wooden magazine bottom.

The photo credit is given to Dr. Rolf Gminder. Have you had a chance to have a discussion with Dr. Gminder in your travels in Europe about this topic ? Is he of the same opinion ? Do you know what gun Dr. Gminder owned that is shown with the GL-marked magazine in that photo ?

(Please do not misunderstand...I am not "discounting" your observations about cottage industry folks making these up to boost dollars and sales...just wondering if some might be legit...?)
 
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Hello Pete,

I never had an opportunity to have a discussion with Dr. Gminder regarding this subject and, therefore, I would not know his opinion. Even though he might have been a managing director of Mauser at one time, I doubt he had information available which would justify that magazines with the 'GL' hallmark are legitimate.

Considering that only a limited number of pistols/carbines were hallmarked with 'GL' between 1899-1905/06, it is interesting to observe that 95% of those Lugers with 'GL' do not have a magazine with a 'GL' hallmark. What could have been the purpose/reason of stamping a standard magazine with a 'GL'? A magazine is a magazine which requires no special treatment or attention. If the attaching iron of a presentation carbine was not stamped with a 'GL', why should a disposable magazine be stamped with a 'GL'? Think about it...

Albert
 

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I noticed that in Mauro Baudino's book "Luger Artiglieria" he shows Luger prototype serial number 6 in Paul Regnier's collection, and lists it as having the GL hallmark on both the rear toggle and the magazine. Since #6 was extensively modified after the Swiss trials, I wonder if the frame was relieved or if it still employs the early flat button magazine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the comments so far. This mag came in a 1911 Erfurt that I have posted elsewhere and was part of an estate that came from nowhere in Ohio......... Came into a small gun show. There was also a great drilling with it that back then I knew nothing about and passed on. I understand about believing the item and not the story but in this case there was no story.
 
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B/L serial #6 still employs the flat-botton magazine, and I did notice the 'GL' on the pistol and the magazine when I examined the pistol in 1996. I do not mean to question so many 'GL' Lugers in existence, but if B/L serial #5 does not have a 'GL' hallmark nor the magazine which is serial #10, why should B/L serial #6 be an exception? I would like to comment that the rear toggle block was replaced on B/L serial #5 (maybe by the Swiss Arsenal because it has no serial number) when it probably cracked at the square joint. There could be a very slim possibility that it was originally delivered to Bern with a 'GL', but I do not think so. Unfortunately, we may never know the truth.

Albert
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Randall...... Thanks for your interesting comment. The only problem would be that then someone else would own it and they would have all the fun.
 

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It would be of some interest to ascertain when GL´s stamp was last used by either DWM or Mauser for presentation items. Was it ever used AFTER he left the company? Did he personally authorise the use of his monogram - or was the stamp at the disposal of the company?

Patrick
 
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Patrick,

Georg Luger left the DWM factory in 1919 and died in 1923, however, the 'GL' hallmark does not appear anymore after 1907/08. The short life span (1899-1907) of using the 'GL' hallmark and the disappearance of the same hallmark can make you wonder!

Cheers,
Albert
 
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