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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a new addition to my collection. I have been looking for a nice Glisenti pistol at a reasonable price for a couple of years and finally found one.
The Glisenti was adopted by the Italian forces in 1910. Although the original caliber was 7.65 X 22mm, the adopted pistol was chambered for the 9mm Glisenti cartridge. This cartridge was the same size as the 9mm Parabellum round used by the Germans, but generated about 25% less pressure. Here we see a problem starting to develope. Take into account the Glisenti's design had one major flaw, no support on the left side of the frame! Put all these things together: No frame support, chambered for a round that is similar to your allies but with less pressure....bad things. It is stated that Glisenti's have been damaged by the use of the 9mm Parabellum round.
From what I have read, the Glisenti was manufactured until the 1930s and saw use through World War Two. Somewhere around 50,000 were made along with a modified version called the Brixia.
These are very interesting pistols and if you ever get a chance to add one to your collection, jump on it, they are getting scarce. As an added bonus, I was able to locate an original Glisenti lanyard several years ago. They are very similar to the British lanyards, but much thinner and have only a single knot. This one came from Italy. This is the only one I have seen other than one in a photograph.
According to Rex Trye's book, "Mussolini's Soldiers", "Some officers had a preference for the 'Luger-look' of the Glisenti, even if the Beretta was superior in performance." Enjoy. Dean


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I am not sure where this serial number falls in the production time frame.


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Here is the side plate removed showing the design weakness. As you can see, the takedown tool is missing, I am still looking for one.


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Hello Pancho
This is a scan of the Italian Model 1910 Glisenti Pistol Combination Tool from "Gun Tools, Their History and Identification" pg. 234 by Shaffer, Rutledge and Dorsey. Its a nice reference book for a lot of different periods of gun tools.

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"Firearms Assembly 4, The NRA Guide to Pistols and Revolvers" covers the disassembly of the pistol on pages 108 and 109 and illustrates the different uses of the tool.
Hope this helps a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pancho,
With the pistol unloaded, press the detent that secures the thumb screw under the barrel. Loosen the screw and swing the left side plate away from the frame. Make sure the plate does not hang up on the left grip plate and chip it. With the plate removed, lift up the left grip. The tool and workings will be visible now.
Dean
 

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Greg,
I am not good at making a sketch and trying to post it, so I will try to explain it to you in words. After removing the left grip, you will see a 1/4 in. bar going across the opening in the frame. This bar is about 1 in. above the base of the frame where the magazine is inserted. This bar has three raised bosses on it and a screw going through all three. Between the right boss and the middle boss is a lever that pivots in the middle with a checkered bottom end. This lever is what releases the magazine. Now, we have the middle boss and the left boss about 3/8 inch apart with the other half of the screw going through. Behind this screw the two bosses are slotted. The take down tool fits into these slots. If a tool was in place when you removed the grip panel you would see the tool and behind it the magazine. I hope you can understand this, I have a tendency to ramble on!!!


Dave
 
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Reply to Dqiz

A good presentation on the Glisenti. I DO take exception to one comment if you don't mind. You stated:

....chambered for a round that is similar to your allies but with less pressure....bad things...

When the Glisenti 1910 was tested and purchased, the Italians were not allied with the Germans. The Italian Army FOUGHT the German and Austro-Hungarian Armies during World War I. Only after the Facist Benito Musolini came to power in 1923 did the Italians begin to allign themselves with anything German.

Lazarus40
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lazarus40,
Great point! I guess I didn't write it correctly from a historical perspective. I skipped a big part and went right to WW2. I was just pointing out that when they did hook up later on, the potential for mixing ammo occurred.
Dean
 
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