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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
me would interest whether this Holster an original is, or a Fake? Sees which too well out for an original,or?
orig. Zugriemen available, marked manufacturers: "Lederwarenwerk Curt bird Cottbus" 1938 and WaA 94
Greeting Tim.


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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have still forgotten to ask which it am worth if it an original would be, thanks TIM from Germany.
 

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You need to become aware of the German techniqes of stitching in this era of sadderly because if you don't , you and others will learn the hard way. The holster is a fake.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hello Huggiebear,
that I imagined already nearly, I wanted only once to inquire for safety's sake. Huggiebear thanks, Tim.
 

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Huggiebear,
can you expand on that a bit so that we uneducated maroons might learn a tip or two on evaluating stitching. Would really appreciate just a bit of info.
Thanks,
Pancho
 

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This holster is not a fake. If you will take a close look at the closure strap and the back belt loops you can probably see that they are replacements. This makes the holster look suspicious. The body however is original German period made.Huggiebear is right in one respect and it is important to look at the stitching on holsters very carefully.

Some of the more salient points to watch out for are found on the back of the holster.
Where the stitching extends beyond the left belt loop on the right bottom to hold the closure strap on the interior panel. On fakes this is many times found stitched either high and to the right, often seperated from the belt loop by a quarter to half an inch. On Originals it is simply a straight line extension.

Another stitching fault that is most noticeable on fakes is in the upper left corner of the back. This stitching is at the top of the hinge and magazine pouch area and goes over far enough to form a cross box on original holsters. On fakes they rarely bother to complete this and it will not intersect to form the complete box.
If you are able to see the holster close up you will notice that fakes will be sewn with either cotton or synthetic thread. Cotton is fuzzy and synthetic is slick looking with thin strands. Original pre 45 German holsters were always sewn with linen thread. It is like old time rope. It is formed with many cords and is easily detected. It will have a smooth surface with no fuzz. Cords will be evident at every place you can see it on the surface unless it has been severly worn down roughly and has become fuzzy because of this. It is also noticeably thick as well.
Most fake holsters such as the CMR brand are made of leather that might be twice as thick as original. I recently had a CMR Artillery in my shop for repair and the holster must have weighed two pounds. I measured the leather and it was exactly twice as thick as an original Artillery.
Another sometimes very obvious sign on the front is the placement of the pull-up strap hole. On fakes they don't seem to care where it goes and it is often found either way too close to the top edge or in the center of the holster. Many examples I have examined also do not tie the proper knot in the end of the strap but fold it over and stitch it.
Another tell tale most often recognized from a front on photo is the large boxy magazine pouch. On fakes they make them oversized and they stand out.
This is just a short overview and a few of the many examples of what to look for when examining a holster for authenticity. There are many more but this should suffice to get many of you started thinking of what to look for. Many fake holsters are advertised as such on eBay and you can hold one of your originals in your lap and pull one of the fakes up on your computer screen. Examine them both together and these obvious faults will jump right out at you.
As with most any antiquity, it is important to look for age and patina, wear and use. You must familiarize yourself with what it ought to look like in order to see faults. Good luck! Jerry Burney
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lugerholsterrepair

"For those who Fight For It, Life has a flavor the protected will never know
 

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one very important aspect of any WW2 German hardshell holsters is that when they first started to assemble the holster to together, you will notice that when the producers were stitching the magazine pouch on to the shell body they stopped just below the magazine pouch as viewed from the backside of the holster. This will differ in distance between manufacturers as to distances from bottom of pouch to where they stopped but it will be there nonetheless. Usually one inch but could be shorter or longer. When they started up again to continue to sew the holster back to the front they will have a "connecting" stitch if you will, where one stitch stopped and the other stitch begins and will be doubled at this point. This fact has never been reproduced on any reproduction holster, BECAUSE, the current makers don't make or assemble the holster the way the Germans originally did.
 
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