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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a TT33 yesterday st my LGS. It is a 1942 production and it is in excellent condition. Maybe too good!

Are there any proof marks or signs to indicate a gun that was reworked/refinished? I got it for a great price, so I’m not worried about the collector’s value…I just want to know if it’s original or if it had a “touch up” some time in the last 80 years!

Thanks!

Camera accessory Bicycle part Audio equipment Bumper Gas

Wood Automotive exterior Gas Bumper Auto part

Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Gun accessory

Air gun Trigger Wood Grey Gun barrel
 

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Its been refinished.l …… Dull shoe Polish look. Mine had Polish grips on it when I got this TT33……. Not sure if the Poles messed with the finish when they put in the new barrel, magazine, grips. I don’t think the Poles ever used this TT33.
 

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I have these two that I bought a few years ago.
Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Material property

Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Judging bluing can be hard to do - examples of being taught (and still learning) - I was shown 5 K dates and Bill asked me which one is reblued? (from Bill the answer was always none, because he didn't want refinished guns in his collection. But stamping can be lighter than you'd expect.
Then there are 'true' reworks, they usually look much better than a reblue in the states.
 

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One of the easiest ways to identify reblue is that the two rear faces of the trigger group frame which show at the rear of the slide are in the white on an original.




Small inspection stamps such as the ones on the slide-lock and trigger will break through the original blue




There is a temper line on the slide, much like a Model 1911A1.




There is cross-directional buffing on either side of the front sight.




Barrel is always in the white

 

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From the standpoint of metalwork(polishing lines, sharp edges, proofmarks), the gun appears to be original - meaning: it was not buffed in any way.
I still cannot see the quality of the blueing well enough to say if it was “dipped” or not.
Finally, the blueing on late war guns was different than on the early guns.
If this one was redone - then probably a Russian Arsenal redo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, @martin08 - neither the barrel nor the rear of the trigger frame group are in the white, so I’m going to go with “refinished”.

Are there any proof/roll marks to look for that might indicate where/when it was redone (similar to 1911 arsenal rebuilds)? Not that it matters to me, but I’d like to understand as much of this gun’s history as I can.

Thanks!!
 

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Thanks, @martin08 - neither the barrel nor the rear of the trigger frame group are in the white, so I’m going to go with “refinished”.

Are there any proof/roll marks to look for that might indicate where/when it was redone (similar to 1911 arsenal rebuilds)? Not that it matters to me, but I’d like to understand as much of this gun’s history as I can.

Thanks!!
Many Soviet guns exhibited rebuild marks, the most common are the first two marks in the table below. But not all guns received marks.
Another common Soviet mark was simply the 'X'. But that mark was most prevalent on captured weapons.

Font Material property Parallel Pattern Rectangle
 

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I hope that / wish for some of the more advanced collectors on the forum will put together a Zoom presentation on identifying refinished pistols. Reading about tale tells is a poor substitute for experience. JGW
I think it's a great idea. I'm sure a "basic" tutorial in spotting a refinished gun could be accomplished. I think the challenge is that beyond the simple basics, each model of gun has its own unique ways of revealing that it has been refinished. Even within a model of a gun, the variations will have different tell-tale signs. Experience and education give a collector the tools to know where to look and what it should look like. It's a big topic!
 

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Please note there is no color change on Navy87guy's Tokarev slide. It is uniformly black/blue. I think that is incorrect. Tokarev's slide was hardened before bluing, the slide of original finish is supposed to show color difference in the ejection port area.

But, I don't know Russian simplified the making process during wartime or not. Is uniform colored slide a norm on the wartime made Tokarevs ??
 

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Here is a prewar Tokarev. Please note the slide color change on its ejection port area:

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For those who enjoy this kind of “detective work”, here are some close ups of the proof marks I could find. Sorry if the quality isn’t the best - I’m taking them under a 10X magnifier so it’s a bit challenging!

Marks on the trigger:

Automotive tire Bicycle part Motor vehicle Wood Rim


On the frame, underneath the slide:

Guitar accessory Wood Tints and shades Metal Electric blue


On/near the slide stop:

Light Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Automotive design


Left side trigger guard:

Tints and shades Gas Electric blue Metal Natural material


Right side trigger guard:

Wood Tints and shades Gas Metal Close-up
 
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