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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
yeah - I am sure some were faked, but I don't know of any for regular 1940/42 lugers.
What is more likely to be faked are commercials made into other things like navies or a new rare variant. Not all fakes are cheap, but all fakes are usually expensive. If its very nice looking or has 'rare' markings, beware of it. But most lugers are more likely priced high because someone told them they saw one sell for $5000
So you think this one looks good? I know enough to know that everything seems to match up and be authentic. But it is difficult to say because these are so rare.
 

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Fonts on the Barrel and left side receiver as well as side plate and disassembling lever matches.
Grey Handwriting Font Automotive tire Liquid

Bumper Gun accessory Font Automotive tire Auto part


On the frame different story (you can spot difference by looking 5 & 1):
Gas Auto part Composite material Fixture Engineering


But I think I read somewhere here on the forum that they don't have to necessarily carry same font style everywhere? Possible they had different styles punch stamp dies of different manufacturers?
BTW do you have some proof marks on the front of the sight?

What I think that is far easier to "fake" after 1937 Lugers than 1908-1937 ones because of hot salt bluing. Rust bluing faking would be more demanding. They are all genuine Lugers of course even if refitted to match but then they are not collectible.

If this particular model has good barrel, price and if it shoots I would take it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Fonts on the Barrel and left side receiver as well as side plate and disassembling lever matches.
View attachment 670489
View attachment 670490

On the frame different story (you can spot difference by looking 5 & 1):
View attachment 670491

But I think I read somewhere here on the forum that they don't have to necessarily carry same font style everywhere? Possible they had different styles punch stamp dies of different manufacturers?
BTW do you have some proof marks on the front of the sight?

What I think that is far easier to "fake" after 1937 Lugers than 1908-1937 ones because of hot salt bluing. Rust bluing faking would be more demanding. They are all genuine Lugers of course even if refitted to match but then they are not collectible.

If this particular model has good barrel, price and if it shoots I would take it.
It’s value if authentic comes from it being a 41/42 Luger. That would make it a 7000 dollar gun on the upper retail market. However the asking price is far lower at 2600. The people on the forum tend to think it is genuine but I know that if someone was really determined enough, they could put in a 42 coded toggle assembly with “matching” numbers into a 1941 Luger and thus have a much rarer and valuable variant. My main interest in this Luger is for collector appeal as opposed to simply purchasing a Luger. And based on my research the serial number font on the front of the frame is supposed to be different. You can really tell this distinction with the number three. Threes on the frame are like this kind of three “3” and threes on the small parts are topped off with a horizontal straight line. I just don’t know if there’s a way to determine if it’s authentic from any standpoint. The books say only 7000 41/42 coded Lugers were made.
 

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That is very interesting indeed. I mean price variations on Lugers...

Weimar era Police Lugers (especially commercial style DWM's in Police service for example) imho looks far better than this newer WWII Mauser's (bluing, police unit markings on the frame, wooden grips, strawed parts)
And probably even Weimar era Lugers were carried by some Nazi soldier in WWII? Made in Weimar era, Continued in III Reich and ended up in WWII? Greater history than those expensive Mauser Lugers?

Does this one has to carry some kind of eagle proof mark on front sight? Or anywhere on a barrel? Like lets say double Crown U on front sight of 1939 Mauser Police Banners?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
That is very interesting indeed. I mean price variations on Lugers...

Weimar era Police Lugers (especially commercial style DWM's in Police service for example) imho looks far better than this newer WWII Mauser's (bluing, police unit markings on the frame, wooden grips, strawed parts)
And probably even Weimar era Lugers were carried by some Nazi soldier in WWII? Made in Weimar era, Continued in III Reich and ended up in WWII? Greater history than those expensive Mauser Lugers?

Does this one has to carry some kind of eagle proof mark on front sight? Or anywhere on a barrel? Like lets say double Crown U on front sight of 1939 Mauser Police Banners?
There is truth in your statement. The earlier Lugers undeniably look prettier, but there’s just something about the nazi eagles on the later ones and the black grips on some of them and the fact they were made for world war 2.
 

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It’s value if authentic comes from it being a 41/42 Luger. That would make it a 7000 dollar gun on the upper retail market. However the asking price is far lower at 2600. The people on the forum tend to think it is genuine but I know that if someone was really determined enough, they could put in a 42 coded toggle assembly with “matching” numbers into a 1941 Luger and thus have a much rarer and valuable variant. My main interest in this Luger is for collector appeal as opposed to simply purchasing a Luger. And based on my research the serial number font on the front of the frame is supposed to be different. You can really tell this distinction with the number three. Threes on the frame are like this kind of three “3” and threes on the small parts are topped off with a horizontal straight line. I just don’t know if there’s a way to determine if it’s authentic from any standpoint. The books say only 7000 41/42 coded Lugers were made.
7k for a 41/42 that's nuts. So, part of the fun of being a "luger collector" vs being a luger owner or a luger flipper is the study involved. Your question is this; "Did someone "boost" a '41 byf into a '41/42 by swaping the toggle?" The answer is in the serial suffix and the test proofs on the receiver. Everything you want to know can be found in the stickys.

So, you tell me. Is this gun a '41 byf with a correctly numbered 42 code toggle? Or is it a righteous 41/42?

The last 41/42 that Simpson's sold went for $2,700ish I personally wouldn't pay $2,600 for this pitted luger but if a "good example" is now 7k and the bubble doesn't pop maybe it's a good deal. JB
 

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You can try and verify it yourself or point to someone from this forum you feel would know best.
PLEASE DON'T RELY ON EXPERTS HERE ON THE FORUM for something that you are looking to buy. You think its good, its good, but after almost 3 pages, you either have made up your mind or haven't.

7K for something you call rare, I think you are trying to convince yourself.
Or is it tire kicking?

Don't put off on us whether YOU should buy? It is your decision, not ours.
 

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The 41/42, according to Jan C.Still, had a total amount of 7,000 manufactured...Hallock & van de Kant, this is from memory, say closer to 10,000...if you consider strictly production quantities pertaining to "rarity", I do not know if I would call it rare.. then again, people bring up the total of 1934 "K"- dates manufactured...also 1937 1st. variation Mausers w/the Mauser "hump", being at 3,206...take your pick...pertaining to the last one mentioned, I am happy to own three such "rare" 1937's...and I will throw in "lucky", too...😏

Edward
 

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I agree, Ed! I did have a 41/42 with an 's' suffix that came out of a vet's estate. I'm not sure I knew about the n & o suffix theory at that time. That was 32 years ago when I sold some Lugers to help pay for the downpayment on the house we purchased at that time. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
PLEASE DON'T RELY ON EXPERTS HERE ON THE FORUM for something that you are looking to buy. You think its good, its good, but after almost 3 pages, you either have made up your mind or haven't.

7K for something you call rare, I think you are trying to convince yourself.
Or is it tire kicking?

Don't put off on us whether YOU should buy? It is your decision, not ours.
Wise words, I was just trying to see if people thought the Luger looked correct. Beyond that, I was going to make the decision for myself. And 7k is on the high end in a specific setting. As opposed to a regular deal with a private seller.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
7k for a 41/42 that's nuts. So, part of the fun of being a "luger collector" vs being a luger owner or a luger flipper is the study involved. Your question is this; "Did someone "boost" a '41 byf into a '41/42 by swaping the toggle?" The answer is in the serial suffix and the test proofs on the receiver. Everything you want to know can be found in the stickys.

So, you tell me. Is this gun a '41 byf with a correctly numbered 42 code toggle? Or is it a righteous 41/42?

The last 41/42 that Simpson's sold went for $2,700ish I personally wouldn't pay $2,600 for this pitted luger but if a "good example" is now 7k and the bubble doesn't pop maybe it's a good deal. JB
Based off the testimony of the forum members and my personal observations it seems to be a righteous 41/42 Luger. Everything is correct based off the observations.
 

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Pinned mags were introduced in 1940 so should be correct for year of manufacture for this gun also 1941/42 were when they made/introduced black Bakelite grips (also referred to as black widow grips) so should also be correct and possibly original for this time frame l would want to verify those grips as if original will add value to this particular Parabellum… again others will know better..!?
 

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I've been reading this posting concerning 41 / 42 lugers with some interest. I have a shooter luger with the 41 date and the 42 toggle but it has one mis-matched number so is only a shooter, not a collector's piece. It has wooded grip panels and the number on the mag doesn't match the number on the frame. I've had the luger since about 1972 and it sleeps in a very nice repro luger holster for protection from bumps and scratches.

On another note if I may. I've ordered an exact reproduction of the Mod. 1907 Test Trials Luger in .45 acp from LugerMan. I've been told to expect delivers of the Luger about mid 2022. So hopefully I should have it in hand within a few months time. In your collective opinions, would you folks think this repro. Luger might increase in value somewhat similar to an original all matching luger that is in say, 80 to 90% condition ? I think even though it is a repro, its value could increase over a few years time. I'd like to know what you "more informed" folks than I am might think.
 

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Sounds like a topic for a new thread.

Short answer, guns always increase in value.

Look at Martz' guns, Stoegers, post war Mausers etc. All lugers go up. JB
 
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