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Just started getting into Lugers and picked up a shooter and a minor collectible I think. This seems to be a great site full of great people and info.

Shooter = all matching but refinished Mauser on left. Pristine Bore
"Other" = 1908 model imperial 1913 A block that is in amazing shape and matching. Grips look darn near new I wish I knew how it got through two wartime periods like this. No holdopen.

Questions:

1) For shooting and storage, what do y'all use for oil? Im thinking CLP since it cures and penetrates a bit and the luger os pretty tight on tolerances. On the grips ill likely use ren wax unless thats bad for some reason.
2) Holsters - What is the best way to get a good one? Harder to find a good one than the luger it seems.
3) My Imperial has what looks like a retaining pin under the takedown lever where the mauser does not. I couldnt find info on this from my Luger books I bought.

Any info and tips appreciated!

Engineering Auto part Gas Eyelash Metal
 

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Welcome - what is best is to ask questions on one at a time.
Folks use anything from clp to hoppes to old oil - I use gun oil such as CLP or Hoppes.
I believe that you are talking about the take down lever spring, so one is missing?
Pictures, full left, full right, full top
 

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Welcome - what is best is to ask questions on one at a time.
Folks use anything from clp to hoppes to old oil - I use gun oil such as CLP or Hoppes.
I believe that you are talking about the take down lever spring, so one is missing?
Pictures, full left, full right, full top
I discourage the use of greases, waxes, or oils on luger wood grips. The reason is it collects in the grooves and can then work like a glue to collect sweat, dirt, dust, and grime. Clean the grips with a soft-medium bristle toothbrush and verify any dirt is removed, then if you wish you can apply a light oil that is safe on wood. Do that with a toothbrush and after 30 minutes, use the toothbrush again to remove any sticky oil residue. Wood swells and shrinks with changes in humidity and can dry out in very dry air, leading to cracks. That is why you should not store wood near a heat vent, in a sunny place, or in any dry place. Maintaining stable 40-60% humidity will protect the wood possibly better than oil without darkening the wood. Walnut is a resilient wood. Those are my thoughts.
 

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I just use Rem oil with Teflon on all my firearms after a thorough cleaning with Hoppes. I store most in my gun safe and living in a low humidity region I don’t worry about corrosion. Holsters, well just keep a look out. You can watch for them at gun shows or online dealers and also on this forum. The hunt is part of the fun, some holsters are tougher to find than others but patience and persistence will pay off. Do your homework as there are quite a few reproductions out there made to look like originals. Good luck and welcome to a great hobby!
Jim
 

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I discourage the use of greases, waxes, or oils on luger wood grips. The reason is it collects in the grooves and can then work like a glue to collect sweat, dirt, dust, and grime. Clean the grips with a soft-medium bristle toothbrush and verify any dirt is removed, then if you wish you can apply a light oil that is safe on wood. Do that with a toothbrush and after 30 minutes, use the toothbrush again to remove any sticky oil residue. Wood swells and shrinks with changes in humidity and can dry out in very dry air, leading to cracks. That is why you should not store wood near a heat vent, in a sunny place, or in any dry place. Maintaining stable 40-60% humidity will protect the wood possibly better than oil without darkening the wood. Walnut is a resilient wood. Those are my thoughts.
I never said to put oil on the grips?
 
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