Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Howdy fellows,

I just got my P08 7.65, I would really appreciate your support helping me to know more about my Luger, I'm wondering why it doesn't have a mark the year like others do, all the big, small, and internal parts match the serial number.
Please check the attached images.

Thank you in advance.
Eddie =)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
921 Posts
Welcome. While your photos are good, unfortunately there are not enough photos to provide much help. Left, right, top and external markings are needed.

Lack of a chamber date, a "Germany" stamp and .30 Luger caliber I tend to associate with pistols imported into the USA intended for commercial buyers. But there are many exceptions. Lugers were made for around 50 years in many variations.

More photos should help us make an actual identification, my comments are really just a guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
One picture identifies your Luger as military issue. More detailed pictures would help but I think it's safe to say that your Luger is a post-WW1 rework converted to .30 caliber for export to America. The date that was on it has been scrubbed as many that were reworked were. While I can't say for certain, the suffix letter on the frame appears to be a "k" and is part of the serial number.

The tell tale picture is the front toggle with DWM and 43 on it. True commercial Lugers did not have a number on the front toggle. Only military pistols did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Welcome. While your photos are good, unfortunately there are not enough photos to provide much help. Left, right, top and external markings are needed.

Lack of a chamber date, a "Germany" stamp and .30 Luger caliber I tend to associate with pistols imported into the USA intended for commercial buyers. But there are many exceptions. Lugers were made for around 50 years in many variations.

More photos should help us make an actual identification, my comments are really just a guess.
Howdy 4Scale
Tyvm for the welcome, I will post more pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
One picture identifies your Luger as military issue. More detailed pictures would help but I think it's safe to say that your Luger is a post-WW1 rework converted to .30 caliber for export to America. The date that was on it has been scrubbed as many that were reworked were. While I can't say for certain, the suffix letter on the frame appears to be a "k" and is part of the serial number.

The tell tale picture is the front toggle with DWM and 43 on it. True commercial Lugers did not have a number on the front toggle. Only military pistols did.
Howdy Doubs
Tx for the support.
Here are more pictures.
I really would love kmow more about my P08 btw it came with vintage Kynoch 7.65 ammo that belongs from WW2 era .
Thank you in advance
Eddie
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
Note the notch in front of the receiver area where the date would have been. DWM only notched those Lugers destined to be made into Artillery models with an 8 inch barrel. At it's lowest setting, the rear sight nestled in that notch. Therefore, your Luger began life as an Artillery model during WW1. (Erfurt, OTOH, notched almost all of their receivers after the military directed them to in late 1916 so the notch on an Erfurt doesn't tell the same story as they only made the LP.08 in 1914)

IF I'm correct that the suffix letter is a "k", then the date would have been 1917. That's the only year that DWM Artillery models (LP.08) reached the "k" block. Jan Still, in his book "Imperial Lugers", estimates that DWM made 90,000 LP.08 pistols that year. No other year comes close to that many.

After WW1, many thousands of former military Lugers were converted to .30 caliber for export to the States and other countries. Some retained the date while others, like yours, were scrubbed. Like the commercial "Alphabet" Lugers made in the 1920's, the converted military guns are great shooters if in decent condition. The Erfurt Luger below is also a WW1 military Luger converted after the war and is completely matching except for the replacement barrel. I've owned it for many years.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Note the notch in front of the receiver area where the date would have been. DWM only notched those Lugers destined to be made into Artillery models with an 8 inch barrel. At it's lowest setting, the rear sight nestled in that notch. Therefore, your Luger began life as an Artillery model during WW1. (Erfurt, OTOH, notched almost all of their receivers after the military directed them to in late 1916 so the notch on an Erfurt doesn't tell the same story as they only made the LP.08 in 1914)

IF I'm correct that the suffix letter is a "k", then the date would have been 1917. That's the only year that DWM Artillery models (LP.08) reached the "k" block. Jan Still, in his book "Imperial Lugers", estimates that DWM made 90,000 LP.08 pistols that year. No other year comes close to that many.

After WW1, many thousands of former military Lugers were converted to .30 caliber for export to the States and other countries. Some retained the date while others, like yours, were scrubbed. Like the commercial "Alphabet" Lugers made in the 1920's, the converted military guns are great shooters if in decent condition. The Erfurt Luger below is also a WW1 military Luger converted after the war and is completely matching except for the replacement barrel. I've owned it for many years.

Hey Doubs,

Tyvm, I really appreciate your background, my Lugers barrel seems to be in decent condition. The grips don't have serial number, that would be because its converted? If you don't mind would you value my Luger please, ofcourse I wont never sale this queen, it would be for my son and then grandson.

Thank you in advance
Eddie =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
Considering the vast numbers of such converted Lugers, the rough exterior condition and the chip missing from the left grip behind the safety - the so-called "million dollar chip" - I'd venture a value of about $700, give or take. Others may value it a bit less or a bit more. Just MHO.

If it's to be passed along to future generations, the dollar value isn't really important. It's the family connections that truly matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

[/QUOTE]

beautiful
Note the notch in front of the receiver area where the date would have been. DWM only notched those Lugers destined to be made into Artillery models with an 8 inch barrel. At it's lowest setting, the rear sight nestled in that notch. Therefore, your Luger began life as an Artillery model during WW1. (Erfurt, OTOH, notched almost all of their receivers after the military directed them to in late 1916 so the notch on an Erfurt doesn't tell the same story as they only made the LP.08 in 1914)

IF I'm correct that the suffix letter is a "k", then the date would have been 1917. That's the only year that DWM Artillery models (LP.08) reached the "k" block. Jan Still, in his book "Imperial Lugers", estimates that DWM made 90,000 LP.08 pistols that year. No other year comes close to that many.

After WW1, many thousands of former military Lugers were converted to .30 caliber for export to the States and other countries. Some retained the date while others, like yours, were scrubbed. Like the commercial "Alphabet" Lugers made in the 1920's, the converted military guns are great shooters if in decent condition. The Erfurt Luger below is also a WW1 military Luger converted after the war and is completely matching except for the replacement barrel. I've owned it for many years.

Omg your Erfort Luger is just beautiful :giggle:
Wich other Lugers do you have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Considering the vast numbers of such converted Lugers, the rough exterior condition and the chip missing from the left grip behind the safety - the so-called "million dollar chip" - I'd venture a value of about $700, give or take. Others may value it a bit less or a bit more. Just MHO.

If it's to be passed along to future generations, the dollar value isn't really important. It's the family connections that truly matter.
So as been converted that's why it doesn't have matching grips?
Woul you show me an image from that missing chip pleas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Considering the vast numbers of such converted Lugers, the rough exterior condition and the chip missing from the left grip behind the safety - the so-called "million dollar chip" - I'd venture a value of about $700, give or take. Others may value it a bit less or a bit more. Just MHO.

If it's to be passed along to future generations, the dollar value isn't really important. It's the family connections that truly matter.
Doubs
Can you tell if my grips belong to my Luger or if they are genuine?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
The conversion wouldn't have involved the grips and it's likely that the original grips would have been numbered to the gun. IMO, your grips are replacements and may even be home made. The chip is on the upper right end of the left grip.

Below are a set of grips from a Mauser Luger... the successor to DWM. Note the inside areas that have been relieved.

 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,290 Posts
Yes, the grips are replacement grips - but after so many years, who knows when they left.
From the exterior, your grips look original to me, so that is good :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: EddieM

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The conversion wouldn't have involved the grips and it's likely that the original grips would have been numbered to the gun. IMO, your grips are replacements and may even be home made. The chip is on the upper right end of the left grip.

Below are a set of grips from a Mauser Luger... the successor to DWM. Note the inside areas that have been relieved.

Tx Doubs.
Very different than mines.
Would you tell me if this is a genuine 9mm barrel, please?
641166
641167
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Yes, the grips are replacement grips - but after so many years, who knows when they left.
From the exterior, your grips look original to me, so that is good :)
Howdy Edward,
So, do you mean that they may be german grips from that period?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,320 Posts
Tx Doubs,Great, then it will work on my P08 =)
It will. A member here named GT does great work. However, if it were me, I'd find another receiver to have the barrel put on. The parts you'll need for the extra receiver are the ejector, sear bar and spring. If you're lucky, you'll find a receiver that includes those parts. Then you can shoot 9mm and .30 cartridges in your Luger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
It will. A member here named GT does great work. However, if it were me, I'd find another receiver to have the barrel put on. The parts you'll need for the extra receiver are the ejector, sear bar and spring. If you're lucky, you'll find a receiver that includes those parts. Then you can shoot 9mm and .30 cartridges in your Luger.
Tyvm for the advice.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top