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I was at an auction recently and set out to bid on a 1932 Commercial PP. During inspection, it was not displayed with a holster. When the pistol went up on the block it was pictured with what I thought was a holster for a 9mm M37. I bid and won anyway and was pleasantly surprised to see the inside markings during post auction inspection (including hck 41 and a Luft Amt). I can always hope the PP was a private purchase. Finally something goes my way. 馃檪

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A very good holster! Like others have said, it may be worth more than the gun. Luftwaffe PP holsters are exceptionally hard to find.
 
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A very good holster! Like others have said, it may be worth more than the gun. Luftwaffe PP holsters are exceptionally hard to find.
Hello All,

I have been noticing these "dropping" holsters for some time at gun shows and have been considering picking one up, but, I have to ask the "newbie" questions: 1. are these style holsters, in general, rare, or just desirable due to their good looks? 2. were they exclusive to the Luftwaffe? 3. is this particular one rare because it is LuftAmt marked, or PP marked or both? 4. why are they called "dropping" holsters?

Thank you,
KK
 

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Hello All,

I have been noticing these "dropping" holsters for some time at gun shows and have been considering picking one up, but, I have to ask the "newbie" questions: 1. are these style holsters, in general, rare, or just desirable due to their good looks? 2. were they exclusive to the Luftwaffe? 3. is this particular one rare because it is LuftAmt marked, or PP marked or both? 4. why are they called "dropping" holsters?

Thank you,
KK
Hi KK, I am definitely not qualified to answer those questions. I am sure others would be more than happy to help or you could post in the Dropping Holster thread for more info.
 

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KK
I'll give it a shot, certainly not the most qualified but it will suffice.

1.) The style is rare depending on which pistol they were made for, like the FN 1922 or Femaru 37M(u.) dropping holsters are relatively common, so they are MUCH cheaper than say an HSc dropping holster. I believe depending on the collector these style of holster are more desirable than a standard military or police holster, but as I meantioned some dropping holsters are just flat out rare and thus bring a high premium due to demand and rarity!

2.) This is a point of a bit of contention, but apparently just because it's a dropping style holster doesn't necessarily mean it was issued to the Luftwaffe. However if the holster has Luftwaffe stamps on the outside flap, inside flap, on the securing tab, or on the back of the belt loop. Or the presence of makers code or Theuermann on the belt loop. Then it is generally accepted to be Luftwaffe issued.

3.) The fact that it is a PP holster is what makes it desirable, quite rare to find, to say the least. Among the rarest are the PP u. PPK, HSc, and iterations of both that have minor differences. I'm sure there is someone who knows more about rare variations because I do not have much knowledge in that particular category.

But I do know that the size/shape of the holster will be a good indication as to which pistol belonged with it, but if the ink stamp designation on the inside flap is still visible it makes the pistol more desirable, and personally I think it's like the cherry on top for a cool Luftwaffe holster. Ex. "N眉r fur Lange Browning Pistole Kal. 7,65" Only for long Browning pistol caliber 7.65mm, aka the FN Browning 1922.

4.) When the securing latch/tab is unlatched/opened the weight of the pistol causes the holster to drop down, riding along those leather strips you see on the outside. So the belt loop stays secured on your hip but the holster itself moves down and rides along those strips to "drop" open.

Regards,
G
 

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KK
I'll give it a shot, certainly not the most qualified but it will suffice.

1.) The style is rare depending on which pistol they were made for, like the FN 1922 or Femaru 37M(u.) dropping holsters are relatively common, so they are MUCH cheaper than say an HSc dropping holster. I believe depending on the collector these style of holster are more desirable than a standard military or police holster, but as I meantioned some dropping holsters are just flat out rare and thus bring a high premium due to demand and rarity!

2.) This is a point of a bit of contention, but apparently just because it's a dropping style holster doesn't necessarily mean it was issued to the Luftwaffe. However if the holster has Luftwaffe stamps on the outside flap, inside flap, on the securing tab, or on the back of the belt loop. Or the presence of makers code or Theuermann on the belt loop. Then it is generally accepted to be Luftwaffe issued.

3.) The fact that it is a PP holster is what makes it desirable, quite rare to find, to say the least. Among the rarest are the PP u. PPK, HSc, and iterations of both that have minor differences. I'm sure there is someone who knows more about rare variations because I do not have much knowledge in that particular category.

But I do know that the size/shape of the holster will be a good indication as to which pistol belonged with it, but if the ink stamp designation on the inside flap is still visible it makes the pistol more desirable, and personally I think it's like the cherry on top for a cool Luftwaffe holster. Ex. "N眉r fur Lange Browning Pistole Kal. 7,65" Only for long Browning pistol caliber 7.65mm, aka the FN Browning 1922.

4.) When the securing latch/tab is unlatched/opened the weight of the pistol causes the holster to drop down, riding along those leather strips you see on the outside. So the belt loop stays secured on your hip but the holster itself moves down and rides along those strips to "drop" open.

Regards,
G
G,

Thank you for taking the time with your detailed responses. Exactly the succinct and insightful answers I was looking for! Now, I have another distraction on which to invest my hard-earned funds!

Regards,

KK
 

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Good morning,
Considering that this thread talks about it I would like to know what today is the value of a holster Femaru 37 in condition almost new.
I think it鈥檚 one of those coming from Eastern Europe like those of the FN 1922.
Ciao Carlo
 

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Carlo this is a shot in the dark but maybe around $250 - $400? I know the Femaru 37M tropical holster is quite sought after, although not the dropping holster in question, I do believe those fetch a slightly higher premium due to their scarcity over the dropping holster version.

Pictures would help to determine value, is the ink stamp nice and visible, where are the makers marks, etc. But please others weigh in here too
 
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