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Discussion Starter #21
Roy666, no unfortunately I have not connected any dots between diamond-in-star and Feldjägerkorps, other than the timeframe I believe both coexisted.
I am really interested to learn what you know about the FJK and the K-in-star Behördenmodells. I see that Volume II page 173 of Jim Cate and Martin Krause, with help from Joe Wotka, discusses an FJK marked holster with a K-in-star Behördenmodell inside, but my understanding is that the holster [unfortunately] was not numbered.
 

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Read it again. #210974. I believe it was marked on the upper right corner of the reverse in standard Prussian police style.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
You, Sir, are correct, I indeed misquoted the article which says the holster was numbered, but what I meant to write was that the holster was not numbered to the Behördenmodell inside
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Joe Wotka has a star-K marked Behördenmodell which he believes was marked for the Feldjägerkorps on the gripstrap
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Added another hard-to-come-by data point: serial number 214052 consistent with the trend: lower serial number means 6-sided diamond

214052 6-sided.jpg
 

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Nieuport,
I don’t know if anyone has noticed or not but looking at the latest pic of the “6 sided in starburst” (which is mine ;) ) compared to the pic of the “6 sided in starburst” on page 1 of this thread where you compared the 6 to the 4...I would venture to guess that they were both made by the exact same die. Looking at them side by side and comparing the strike marks they look too similar to discount the possibility. I don’t know if this has any significance or not but thought that I would put the idea out there. Thanks to everyone for all of the information! I’m new to this forum and am anxious to follow what further information is found.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Welcome to Jan Still's pistols forum, Boneheads ! Glad you decided to join this group of knowledgeable and passionate collectors

I note for the audience that your same-die guess comes from a professional tool and die maker, so it's not coming from a mere amateur (like me!)

FYI, the six-sided diamond in the OP is of BM serial number 215030, only 978 digits after your 214052

If I remember correctly, didn't you inherit your Behördenmodell? Was your family member a veteran?

Doug
 

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Thank you for the welcome! Looking forward to following this! In answer to your question, yes I inherited my BM from my grandfather who served in WWII. I’m not positive but I do believe that he was a medic stationed in occupied France during the war. I was always told that he acquired the pistol from a wounded enemy that passed away. I want to try and find out his area of deployment and verify as much as possible the story I’ve been told.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Found one more of these hard-to-find examples - added a 6-sided diamond to the tally in the OP

Doug
 

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Do you have any evidence that any of these Prussian police accepted Sauer BH in the roughly 213xxx-216xxx range were actually used by the Feldjägerkorps? The only Sauer BHs known to me to be marked for the FJK are in the K in Star accepted BH range just before the polygon in Star range.

Sn 209062 with a K starburst.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Added a couple more diamond-in-star examples to the list (full serial numbers omitted pending authorization from owner of this information)
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I updated the OP table's pistols 214600 (a six-sided-diamond Behördenmodell) and 216764 (a four-sided-diamond Modell 1930 not a BM) with their full serial number having now received permission thanks to the generosity of Horst Friedrich, author of the new book "Dienstwaffen der deutschen Polizei und Gendarmerie - Weimarer Republik 1919 - 1933" ("Service Weapons of the German Police and Gendarmerie - Weimar Republic 1919 - 1933"). Covered are not only pistols (lugers, mausers, sauers, dreyses, etc) but also sub-machine guns, rifles, flare guns, armored cars and more

This excellent 400-page book provides comprehensive details and many high-resolution color-pictures (although the text is currently available only in German)

Anyone interested in a copy, please PM me and I will provide purchase details.


Interestingly, Mr. Friedrich provides details acknowledging not only the existence of these two markings (ie, 6-sided and 4-sided diamond-in-star) but also implies their use by two different authorities. This, IMHO, diminishes if not completely dispels the so-called broken die theory

Doug
 

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nieuport (Doug), I find the following info in conflict with the demands of the Prussian police:
216764 (a six-sided-diamond Modell 1930 not a BM.
The Model 30 pistols did not have the demanded triggersafety or loaded/cocked indicator. So, I have a problem with that pistol and / or the information may well be incorrect. To date, I have never seen or heard of another M.30 with police acceptance. (but as they say, I haven't seen them all yet) JIM
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Jim you are absolutely correct ...... I mis-typed in my post #33 above (now edited to read correctly)

216764 IS indeed a 4-sided-diamond !!! Good eye ;-)
........ but it is a Modell 1930 not a BM as the picture shows in Horst's book

Doug
 

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I updated the OP table's pistols 214600 (a six-sided-diamond Behördenmodell) and 216764 (a four-sided-diamond Modell 1930 not a BM) with their full serial number having now received permission thanks to the generosity of Horst Friedrich, author of the new book "Dienstwaffen der deutschen Polizei und Gendarmerie - Weimarer Republik 1919 - 1933" ("Service Weapons of the German Police and Gendarmerie - Weimar Republic 1919 - 1933"). Covered are not only pistols (lugers, mausers, sauers, dreyses, etc) but also sub-machine guns, rifles, flare guns, armored cars and more

This excellent 400-page book provides comprehensive details and many high-resolution color-pictures (although the text is currently available only in German)

Anyone interested in a copy, please PM me and I will provide purchase details.


Interestingly, Mr. Friedrich provides details acknowledging not only the existence of these two markings (ie, 6-sided and 4-sided diamond-in-star) but also implies their use by two different authorities. This, IMHO, diminishes if not completely dispels the so-called broken die theory

Doug
Horst Friedrich, author of the new book"Dienstwaffen der deutschen Polizei und Gendarmerie - Weimarer Republik1919 - 1933"
Received my copy yesterday oh my it has a wealth of information as to what all was used in the Weimar time by the police, well illustrated and oh boy do I have to brush up on my German it’s good for me to have to give it some thought what does this word tell me (it’s good that it is in a sentence that allows me to figure it out)
Happy Hunting!
Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #38
....... my German stinks, but with Google translate on my smartphone it's easy to get the gist of what the author is saying
 

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Discussion Starter #39
nieuport (Doug), I find the following info in conflict with the demands of the Prussian police:
216764 a Modell 1930 not a BM
The Model 30 pistols did not have the demanded triggersafety or loaded/cocked indicator. So, I have a problem with that pistol and / or the information may well be incorrect. To date, I have never seen or heard of another M.30 with police acceptance. (but as they say, I haven't seen them all yet) JIM
Page 338 of Horst Friedrich's book (BTW anyone interested to purchase please send me a PM) pictures this "police Modell 1930" .... While the picture clearly shows a four-sided diamond-in-starburst, absence of a trigger-safety and presence of the mag-safety cross-pin, unfortunately only the front left side of the pistol is shown (NOT the rear) so no idea whether this pistol unexpectedly might have a loaded/cocked indicator

Your point that absence of these features conflicts with the Prussian police demands is likely a documented fact, but what if this pistol was the property of a different state's police? It's interesting to note that, in his book, Horst attributes the
four-sided diamond-in-starburst property mark to the Bavarian Gendarmerie (!)
 

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I just received my copy of the Friedrich book and noticed the same attribution of these diamond and six sided markings within the star to the Bavarian Police. He continues to attribute the starburst K markings to the Prussian Police.

An excellent book by the way.
 
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