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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I am new to this forum, but I wanted to get some information on the 1918 Luger. My grandfather fought in WWII and brought back a Luger after the war. We thought it had been lost or given away by my crazy gradnmother (his wife), but as luck would have it, my Mom found it today! What a great day! It was in a leather holster and has one magazine. There is some rust, but it does seam to function properly. The bad news, but at the same time kind of "cool", is that one of the grips has "Marks" melted into it. Unfortunately my grandfather died when I was young and not into guns yet, as I would have loved to have heard the story behind that. It is probably the name of a friend of his who took the gun as a souvenier and wanted to make sure no one else got their hands on it. Or maybe he took it from Mark!

Here are the markings:
1918 - base of barrel
240m - under base of barrel
240 - side of gun
40 - side of gun
DWM on top of gun and 40
1373 on the bottom of the clip (there is a crack in the wooden part of the clip)

I was curious what would be a good book to look at for disassembly/assembly and cleaning. I would like to clean it up and fire it and I know my dad would as well! Also, what should I do about the rust? I have heard about using oil and steel wool, but I dont know about that, sounds risky.

Download Attachment: S2400040.JPG
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This is the rusty side and there are some spots of rust on the barrel. The other side is very clean.

Download Attachment: S2400039.JPG
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Download Attachment: S2400041.JPG
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Thanks,
Eddie
 

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Formula51

Welcome to the forum
Your quote

"We thought it had been lost or given away by my crazy gradnmother (his wife), but as luck would have it, my Mom found it today! What a great day"

Don't believe your grandmother was as crazy as that fellow Mark for carving his name on the grip.

My advice to you on this luger providing you have limited or no firearm knowledge would be to take it to a gunsmith to check out first before firing after you have thoroughly cleaned it..

That aside the 240 (m) is the lugers serial number,with the 240 on the receiver and the firearms last two digits on the side plate and rear of toggle,40 will be in other places also after you examine it closer

Looks like the luger was also equipped with a police style sear safety, any markings on the front grip straps.

Very fine steel wool with vegetable oil works well but as you say you may loose some of the bluing.

Overall the luger looks not to bad for rust, possibly storage problem. seen many in worse condition and still functioned quite well after been cleaned.

As for the dissasembly and cleaning the American Gunsmithing Institute puts out an instructional video on the luger. 1325 Imola Ave.West Suite 504 Napa Ca. 94559 707-253-0462
 

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Great day indeed. By all means get that rust stopped. Use 0000 steel wool, gun oil and a light touch. I think you should clean it up and take a lot more closeup pics. So that them that know of what they speak, can tell you more about your new prize.
 

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Hello Eddie, welcome to the forum! As you can see, I collect this very type of luger!

As they said, it was made by DWM in 1918, then after WW1, it was (at some point) taken in by the police and received a "sear" safety after 1933.


Sear Safety and No Sear safety: SearSafe no sear safe.jpg
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This was at the beginning of the nazi era, so it served in three distinct era's, Imperial, Weimar and then Nazi.

At some point, captured, turned in and then bought, traded etc.

Actually, I have one that had rust under the grips, and once I cleaned it up, she was / is a beauty!

Are there any other markings on it, i.e. grip strap, front or rear? My gut feeling is no, or you would have added that!

Ed
 

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Hi,

Check the rounds that came with the gun before you even attempt to fire them. Original Luger ammo is getting rarer every day. Plus they made some pretty corrosive ammo during the old days. Don't use it.

There are good commercially available alternatives.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Think I should clarify a few things. I am at College in South Carolina, Clemson University. The gun is with my mom and dad back home in Maryland. I have very good firearm knowledge for someone my age, 21. I am a mechanical engineering senior, so I am pretty good at figuring out how things work. I also own a firearm (Taurus PT-92) and have shot and taken apart many. Modern firearms are just so much simplier if you ask me. I only have the pics I posted and phone conversations with my dad to go on. I have not actually seen the gun.

Does the Luger fire your regular 9mm Luger/Parabellum ammo (9x19) that you can buy at walmart? Or is it a shorter cartridge like the 9x17? I really have no idea. As for cleaning, what perservative/protectant do yall use after removing the rust? I am only familiar with the stuff used on modern firearms and do not want to mess this one up by using the wrong stuff.


I will ask my dad to check for any markings on the grip strap. I do know there are some markings on the safety, but that is probably just "fire" in German, or something along those lines. My great grandads 1954 Astra Cub has somewhat similar type markings on its safety.

"As they said, it was made by DWM in 1918, then after WW1, it was (at some point) taken in by the police and received a "sear" safety after 1933. This was at the beginning of the nazi era, so it served in three distinct era's, Imperial, Weimar and then Nazi. At some point, captured, turned in and then bought, traded etc."

This is really cool stuff, thanks a lot Weimar Police. Not sure what you mean about the last sentence? My gradfather brought this back from Europe during his WWII duty. He was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Air Force and it has been in his posession ever since he brought it back.

Thanks and keep the info coming.
 

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Same ammo, 9mm luger, 9mm parabellum.

Many times soldiers traded for a gun, bought it with cigarettes, picked it up off of a stack of other guns, or from a dead guy. The info before a dead guy is much more common and realistic.

Any regular gun oil would be good for a gun, whether new or old. Just don't leave tons on it, as it can be tough on the wood grips.

ed
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Under the barrel where it joins the frame and in the vacinity of the 240 m there is another number: 882 There is nothing on the front or rear grip strap.

According to my mom she just recalls that the gun was in the house growing up, she is not exactly sure how or when it got there. My grandfather actually was not in Europe in WWII, he was in Korea and the pacific. However, my great grandfather served in Europe in WWI, so perhaps that is how the gun came to be in our family. So much of history is lost over time.

The grips and the frame underneath look to be in pretty good shape though.


Download Attachment: S2400045.JPG
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I also have a pic of the holster it was in and it does not look like the holster pictures I have been able to find. It has an extra flap of leather if you will that the pics I have seen do not have. I know thats a terrible explanation, but hopefully you see what I mean. I will try to get some more pics and find out what is stamped on it. It needs a good cleaning.


Download Attachment: S2400044.JPG
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Holster has no military type markings or stamps. The back appears to have something hard sewn into it. Also on the back it says "Marks", looks like "Wisconsin", and "(A heart) then a girls name". This appears to be written with a magic marker a long time ago and is hardly visible. Looks like Marks was a collectors nightmare.
 

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Oh well, "Marks" adds to the family history, being on the grip, that is easy to fix or replace, but I'd keep the orginal one!

The 8,82 (notice the comma) is the land to land measurement and was common on lugers prior to WW2.

The gun could ahve been bought by granddad or traded, who knows, he might have gotten it from another vet. The holster appears to be either a civilian holster, but unsure?

Ed
 

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formula 51

Tried to send you a photo of an exploded picture of the luger showing its breakdown but when sizing the photo for this forum picture goes wonky.

Ed with your technical abilities could you scan the photo page four in Third Reich lugers and post this for this young man.

Thankyou
 
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