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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw a 1938 S/42 Luger at the Portland gun show today with N 3675 on the front grip strap. The aluminum-base magazine was not matching, but was marked N 3678 above the weapon serial number.

This gun and its marks appear to be proper as described by Jan Still in "Third Reich Lugers". My question has to do with their application. The Navy marks appear to be applied by pantograph, rather than stamping dies.

My recollection is that the Eagle/M Kriegsmarine marking was pantographed rather than stamped. Is the Unit marking properly found pantographed as well?

--Dwight
 

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Dwight

The ones I used to have with N property numbers were completely die struck including the Crown M

These marks were on the rear grip strap

Dwight-- Third reich lugers page 107 top of page. Still reports that O property number engraved (lengthwise) on front strap. Some of those dated 1936-1939 have their n property number on the front instead of the rear grip strap.

What would a person do without these excellent references.
 

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The Navy property numbers on Mauser Lugers are pantographed. On page 107 Third Reich Lugers I stated "engraved" when I should have stated "pantographed"(I still have difficulty telling pantographed from engraved).

The same applies to Navy Mauser 1934's. The property numbers and E/M are also pantographed.
Jan
 

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Jan

Thankyou for the wording correction. Myself I class pantographed and engraved into one although some would strongly argue that a pantograph is a vastly different process than an engraving and they would be correct..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jan and James,

Thanks very much for the information.

Pantograph and engraving can be differentiated if you keep in mind that pantographing is done with a rotary tool. Under magnification it can be seen that the lines are 'swirled' inside the strokes, all the lines are the same width, and all outside corners are rounded.

Engraving can change line width, straight lines often have no 'chatter' inside them (depending on the skill of the engraver) and corners are characteristically sharp.

--Dwight
 
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