Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's interesting and remarkable to me that the workmanship....at least the exterior finish...on DWM Lugers didn't decline in the last year or two of WW1. I certainly stand to be corrected, but a 1918 looks as good as a 1914. I contrast this with the deterioration of German firearm finishes in the 1943-45 time frame(WW2). Are, in fact, DWM(or Erfurt)late Lugers as good as earlier specimens as far as internal workmanship and reliability are concerned? Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,987 Posts
Consider yourself corrected! <BG> A close look at any 1917/1918 Luger by either manufacturer will show machine markings that won't be nearly as obvious on an earlier - even most 1916 - Lugers. The exterior finish most assuredly suffered as the war drew to a close. The one thing that, IMO, didn't suffer was the reliability of the later Lugers. They seem to be as functional as the earlier guns and the parts that matter during the function of the gun will be properly fitted and finished for reliable operation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Jim, you might want to look at the following two posts on this forum

JAn Still's 1910 DWM posted on October 5, 2203, and 1918 DWM and holster, posted by me on Oct 2 (about). close look will show the much finer finish on the 1910. The 1918 models are not crude "last ditch eforts" as some would have us believe. But elegance of finish has suffered in terms of production demands. The first downgrade in finish may be observed in 1915 models. The crude and mismatched junk that some dealers want to pass off as "last ditch" 1918 are generally hacked up fakes with production demand being used as an excuse for mismatching. Do not believe it. Look closely at the pictures and also look at some of the 1915 and 1916 models and you will see a gradual increase in the degree of machining marks and also blueing wear on moving surfaces indicating a bit more tolerance in fittings.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Heinz: You are enlightening. I'm looking for a nice Imperial pistol and I've shunned the late WW1 DWM issue guns(and Erfurts) considering only 1916 and earlier. Perhaps I'm a bit narrow-minded. Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Jim, If you are shopping for an imperial Luger first buy Jan Still's Book on the subject. It will give you a sound basis. The 1908 through 1914 have the best finish as I mentioned above. The finish degrades slightly throughout 1918, you will note the 1918 I posted photos of is in the first 10,000 produced in 1918. If you can afford it a unit marked 1910 to 1914 is probably a good bet, you get great quality and can track something of the pistols history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Maybe I´m just prejudiced. But early DWM Lugers are definitely a work of art. Experts here in Germany always tell me the Mauser Lugers reflect imoprovements in metallurgy - and the tables in Goertz´ Pistole 08 would seem to prove this point. Goerz also pointed out that Swiss Lugers are generally regarded as the zenith of the weapon´s development. German law restricts ownership - so I´ll stick to DWM.

Patrick
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
villiers: I've never seen a Swiss Luger that was in sad shape. Strangely, they were cared for nicely. Jim
 

·
Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
6,230 Posts
Jim, the condition of Swiss Lugers may have something to do with Switzerland's very successful policy of neutrality.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,073 Posts
I am no expert on Swiss (by far), but I thought I had read that Swiss lugers were re-arsenaled on a set schedule?

Ed
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top