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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When we talk about World War One or World War Two, the names Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia rarely come up. Maybe there is the mention of a Latvian Luger or an Estonian or Lithuanian High Power, but little else in the way of handguns.
When we look at a map of the Baltic States we see they are in a very tactical position, right between the Baltic Sea and Russia. This makes for a tough existence.
Before I talk about this handgun, lets take a closer look at Lithuania and its troubles from its independence to the end of World War Two when the Iron Curtin closed around it.
With Russia in turmoil during WW1 and the Revolution of 1917, which resulted in the overthrow of the Czar, Lithuania declared its independence (February of 1918). This didn’t come easy. Immediately, Russian troops invaded but were later thrown out by the Germans. Following the WW1 German surrender, Russian troops again invaded Lithuania. The Polish came into the picture to support Lithuania (Which helped precipitate the Russo-Polish War of 1919-1920). Fighting continued between Russia and Lithuania until the signing of the Treaty of Moscow on July 12, 1920.
When World War Two began, the Germans helped Russia annex Lithuania. Later, when Germany invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, the Nazi’s occupied Lithuania until the end of the war, when Lithuania was once again under Soviet control.
The revolver featured below is a standard issue, double action Model 1895 Nagant, matching serial number 3029. It was manufactured at the Tula Arsenal in 1916. The thing that makes this revolver unique is the Lithuanian property marks on it. These marks are in the form of the Lithuanian crest known as the “Pillars of Gediminas”. Sometime during the career of this Nagant, it was captured from the Russians and reproofed by the Lithuanians!
Who knows when this happened, but it probably occurred early in its lifetime, as the condition is excellent.
This revolver is an interesting part of WW1 and WW2 history.
Note: This revolver and two other Lithuanian marked examples (serials 11312 and 2706) are from the Collection of the late Rolf H. Muller. All three known examples were brought here to the United States and auctioned off by Butterfield & Butterfield in 1994.
I hope you enjoy this revolver and please ask any questions or post additional information.
Dean


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Russian eagle proof mark.


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Lithuanian proof marks.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Val,
The Nagant revolvers in original condition can be hard to find anymore. There are lots of them that were imported a few years ago. Most had been arsenal refinished. The good thing is that you can find nice reasenaled examples for great prices.
I do have a few original Russian examples. A 1926 CCCP marked one, a 1940 Tula and a 1944 Ivshek. All are original condition.
Dean


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