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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I found a fine Artillery Luger, with holster, tool and cleaning rod. Bought it from a Belgium Highway Police man, who sold it to invest more in his M.G.A. restoration - project. He bought it in 1982 from an Englishman. All matching SN, 8494. No stock lug, nor stock - leather. Both LP.08 and holster are in top - condition.

I will post pictures here in the near future, but I am now puzzled by the unit - marking, both with the marking itself, and the spot where it was struck.

It reads L.M.K.72.
It is struck just above the side plate, on the receiver. Nothing on the frame. No unit - markings in the holster.

I would like to learn for which unit this marked stands.
Thanks for helping me out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello kk,

I never underestimate one's insticts...

However, this LP.08 is fully proofmarked by DWM and the German Army. After being captured by an English soldier during WWI, it was brought home, and duly stamped with all the British proofmarks you can think of. It never left the British iles until 1982. How could the Danes have managed to put their markings on it?

I have been looking through all my books. The one and only half-hit is in Walters encyclopedia, under (L43 - page 154) L.M.G. : Lehr Maschinen Gewehr Kompagnie. But I have L.M.K. ...
Somehow I think we are near, but not really got the right answer yet.

Appreciate your help, and all instincts are welcome.
 

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Due to the nonconventional location of the marking and the oddball marking itself, my bet is that it is a 1919-1921 provisional marking and it's anyone's wild-*** guess as to what it means. Glad to have been of help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Geo, Patrick,

Thanks for your echo's and friendly suggestions. As the Englishman who sold the rig in 1982 keeps saying that it was a piece his father brought back in 1918 (British proof stamps!), one would think that these unit markings on a 1915 LP.08 should have a connection to a WWI German Army unit...

Just a few suggestions:
Leichte Maschinen(gewehr)Kompagnie ?
Lehr Mortieren Kompagnie ?
Leichte Munitions Kolonne (Bavaria) ?

I think that this is one of those undiscovered mysteries we must learn to live with. As promised, I will publish pictures here later. Would have loved the idea however, to put some information about the military unit also.

Thanks for the comments.
 

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Joop, it may be possible to date the pistol's capture by the British proofs.

I think that I have understood that the Brits changed the protocol for proofing between the wars. Perhaps the type of brit proofs will verify when the pistol was captured.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Geo,

I did not know that the British proof marks are recognizable as to the era they were struck. Do you have an idea of where I could find references about that? I agree that this is the first step to go through, because it would eliminate a lot of possiblities ( or enlarge them).

Thanks for this tip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Klaus,

Thank you very much for this precise and fully complete answer. I will try to find the book, in order to prepair a thread here to this rig.
 

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The British proof law was changed in 1925, and then again in 1955. Basically the difference in the pre and post 1925 proof law was that in 1925 the letters under the crown had a circle added around the letters. The major change in the 1955 proof law added the cartridge dimensions and proof load to the barrel.

It is my understanding that at the time period mentioned the pistol would not have been proofed at the time it was brought back, but would have to be proofed if it was to be sold.

Additionally, the 1925-1955 proof law required the NOT ENGLISH MAKE marking on firearms not made in England. This requirement was dropped with the 1955 proof law.
 

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Jeff Noll's book, The Imperial German Regimental Marking, on page 52 and 53 list similar unit markings; all seem to agree with Klaus' interpretation. Very interesting info on the British Proof laws.
 
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