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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Serial No. 6542, no grip strap stampings, alum. bottom magazine #4281 in pistol, complete artillery rig.
Brown holster stamped on inside: Berlin 1915 (maker's name illegible), F.A.R. 60 ink stamped in box.
On the outside of the top flap is a Lufwaffe medallion of the wreath and encircled within the wreath is an Eagle with a swastika in it's claw. This is covered when the top loop is connected to the closure strap.
Takedown tool stamped E/655.
Cleaning rod has no stamping.
Magazine pouch on shoulder strap is original with (2) alum. bottom magazines in pouch #1947 & #7806.
Stock board appears to be a nice reproduction but because of no stampings I assume it is.
Can anyone supply history, information, translation of F.A.R.60 on this rig.
Bill
 

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Bill,
F.A.R.60 is the 60th Field Artillery Regiment. It was assigned to the the 17th Infantry Div. Which was part 9th Army Corps.
1914
Went into action against the British Aug 24th.On the North bank of the Aisne river.
1915
Launched an attack in Champagne.
1916
Suffered heavy losses at the Somme July 10th-25th. And then moved to Artois until Dec 24.
1917
Back to Somme where it suffered more heavy losses holding off numerous British counter attacks in the Oppy-Gavrelle sector.
Moved to Flanders June 9th. At Ypres, suffered more losses due to artillery bombardment.
1918
Engaged in the Battle of Picardy. Fought at Bucquoy.
Moved to Vesle Aug 1, where held the line against the American forces. And was commended for doing so. Was finally driven back.
Back to Champagne Oct 4. Was driven back by the French.
Ardennes Oct 28 where it lost 558 men as prisoners of War.

It was rated as one of the best Divisions in the German Army.

Ron
 

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Ron, this is why I am thinking of collecting WW1 unit marked, because you can see where this gun served!

Great info.

Bill, can you provide pictures for us?

Ed
 

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Ed, This is what I like also. Although, I wish this kind of information was available for the Weimar Reichswehr units. I would really love to find a detailed history of the encounters on the Czech and Polish frontiers during this period.

Ron
 

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Ron,"The Evolution of Blitzkrieg Tactics, Germany Defends Itself Against Poland 1918-1933" by Robert M. Citino deals with the formation of the Reichswehr and home defense units. Far more text and fewer charts than "251" but it's a start. I have an extra copy $32 for anyone who wants it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ron & Ed
As I am new on this site so I can't thank you enough for your expertise & knowledge on this Luger.
I hope I'm not boring you with these questions so please bear with me.
I doubt that this is a matched rig because of the 1915 holster & 1918 LP08. Could it be possible they came together at some point in time in WWI?
Is there any information on why the 1920 date. Where were they reissued to?
Also, what's with the Lufwaffe medallion. I read somewhere that some of them were used by the German Lufwaffe in WWII but I can't remember where. Can someone answer this?
I don't have the capability of posting photos that is why I try to describe them to the best of my ability.
Bill
 

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Bill
The 1920 "date" is actually a property mark of the German Weimar Republic 1920-1933. All of their military items was supposed to be marked 1920 to identify it as government property. You will also find this mark on police weapons, etc. They used the number 1920, as that was year the Weimar Government was created, replacing the Imperial system. Many of these military Lugers have what is referred to as "double dates" on their chambers, the year the weapon was made and the 1920 property mark. You didn't mention if your LP-08 was a "double dated" model.

As far as the holster having a Luftwaffe pin attached, it was placed there in all probability by the GI who "captured" this Luger. The German military didn't allow for the attachment of any pins to their holsters. It was a fairly common practice for GIs to affix various pins or medals to their Luger or P-38 holsters in order to make them look "better" and also to personalized them. The holes through the leather caused by these pins devalue the holsters, unless the buyer likes the look of the pin.

Hope this info is helpfull.
Joe
 

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Bill: I don't remember who to give credit to, but it has been pointed out here before that a lot of Artillery holsters were produced in 1915 and that they came together in the supply system so stocks of holsters and pistols would not need to be "matched" to the year of production for either one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Joe
The LP08 is double dated 1918-1920.
Is there any other information that you might add because it is double dated ?
I thought that about the medallion but I also wanted to hear it from someone else.
I don't partially like it but if I remove it the holes as you stated will be there.
The holes are hidden by the top flap when the holster is closed.
Thank you for in advance for any other information.

Chuck
Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it.
Bill
 

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Bill
The date on this Luger's chamber, 1918 was the year it was manufactured. After the War this weapon was kept as part of the Weimar Government's inventory, so they "property" marked it "1920" in order to show ownership.

If a person was found with property that was marked "1920" he better have a good reason for having it in his possession, as it belonged to the government. In those days there was really no way of tracing serial numbers, as there were no computers, so they marked the government equipment with the formation date of the Weimar Government, 1920.

So what you have is a LP-08 that was used in the last year of the Great War, later retained by the Weimar military and finally used in WW II by the Germans, where it was "captured" and brought to the USA.

The medal attached to the holster effects it value according to personal preference, some guys like it, most don't, as they want the holster in it's original condition. The GI who brought it home, thought the medal added to the "look" of the holster, he was not thinking that it would someday be very desired by military collectors.

Hope this helps.
Joe
 
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