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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a mis-matched shooter grade Luger, 1940 date, 42 on toggle, that looks pretty good and is quite accurate, except recently I've run into a problem with it firing. It will not fire unless I put heavy pressure on the "side plate" before squeezing the trigger. I've checked the "side plate" and "locking bolt" and neither looks too worn. The "locking bolt" seems to tighten quite well. The "side plate" and "locking bolt" do match the frame and barrel number. I've tried replacing the "trigger lever" with a new one; this did not help. Has anyone run into this problem and do you have any recommendations? Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I may have had a similar problem. Occasionally, the Luger would simply fail to fire even though the firing pin was cocked. I thought at first it was due to play between the barrel/receiver and the frame, and if I pushed the barrel/receiver to the left, I could get it to fire consistently. This might have a similar effect to what you are doing pushing the side plate. But in checking other Lugers at a gun show I decided the play between the barrel/receiver and the frame on mine was normal.

I ended up carefully polishing the sear engagement surfaces on both the firing pin and the trigger bar with a hard Arkansas stone. The surfaces were a bit rough and I think it was binding on occasion. This solved the problem for me. I wouldn’t recommend this if you haven’t done this kind of work before.
 

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Mark,

yes, I´ve had that problem and it´s quite common. The take-down lever can get bent over the years. This loosens the side-plated and the trigger lever then does not exert enough pressure on the sear bar. This happens mostly with mismatching side-plates and is one of the main reasons why Lugers (and most weapons of that age) were tested with matching parts and then "fully numbered".

Solution: the take-down lever can be removed easily without using any tools and can then be (very slightly) bent back. BUT if this is the problem, it´s very likely high time that the weapon needs to be inspected by a qualified gun smith.

DIY tinkering with the trigger mechanism can VERY EASILY LEAD TO A FULL AUTO sequence - which is disconcerting and also VERY DANGEROUS!.

Patrtck
 
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