Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
21 - 24 of 24 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5,805 Posts
Well, that goes without saying! Of course they are collectable! The question asked however..does the Norway conversion affect price? No one seems to have any opinion worth noting on that subject they are willing to share..except me. And I say with no doubt, YES. It DOES affect the price. ANY holster with great historical markings would be worth MORE if it was not converted by the Norway/US GI belt hooks. If anyone thinks otherwise..please state your case!
I didn't think your statement needed validation and agree- they are worth less; but then holsters are all over the place price wise too.

I have no idea how much less, but would know the price at which I would buy or not; and that price would vary from holster to holster and my "mood" of the day- and what else I bought that day, week, or month. ;)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
I certainly agree the US belt hangers cause a Luger holster to decrease in value, but then again, sometimes the rarity or the uniqueness of a holster makes it a worthwhile addition to a collection.

I have a Dingeldey & Werres 1918 Artillery holster
With Pre 1922 police markings (M.I. 724)
With post 1922 police markings (S.B. 8984)
Used by the German Army in Norway
Modified by the Norwegians

They certainly got their money's worth out of THAT holster! I think that all those markings and the fact it survived two wars, the Weimar era and service in Police units only to end up being modified for further use in Norway makes it one of those oddballs that a holster collector would want to add to his collection. While he may have a standard WWI artillery, might have one cut-down for Pre-1922 police use, might have another artillery kept around and marked for police use, just might have another that was cut down for WWII Army units or might have a garden variety holster modified for the US belt hanger....

This one has all those in one package....and is probably much "rarer" than any of the others as individually marked.

Just my opinion that the provenance of an item over that of another may effect value to collectors.

EDIT: Don, it is cut down to regular size for a non-artillery/navy pistol. Has the mag pouch on the side and the stitching holes from the cleaning rod are visible. I didn't remove the US style hanger, maybe the Norwegians did before selling it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,805 Posts
Chuck,
Is the holster described below still "long" or cut down?

I certainly agree the US belt hangers cause a Luger holster to decrease in value, but then again, sometimes the rarity or the uniqueness of a holster makes it a worthwhile addition to a collection.

I have a Dingeldey & Werres 1918 Artillery holster
With Pre 1922 police markings (M.I. 724)
With post 1922 police markings (S.B. 8984)
Used by the German Army in Norway
Modified by the Norwegians

They certainly got their money's worth out of THAT holster! I think that all those markings and the fact it survived two wars, the Weimar era and service in Police units only to end up being modified for further use in Norway makes it one of those oddballs that a holster collector would want to add to his collection. While he may have a standard WWI artillery, might have one cut-down for Pre-1922 police use, might have another artillery kept around and marked for police use, just might have another that was cut down for WWII Army units or might have a garden variety holster modified for the US belt hanger....

This one has all those in one package....and is probably much "rarer" than any of the others as individually marked.

Just my opinion that the provenance of an item over that of another may effect value to collectors.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,753 Posts
Personally the value can be determined as follows:

-Original state: Highest value.
-Modified Norwegian State: Medium value.
-Norwegian, restored to original state: Lowest value (it's historically speaking nor one, nor the other).

The Norwegian P08 and holsters saw use and service, comparable to the use by the DDR/GDR for example. We also know that a Norwegian arsenal even produced P08 spare parts. So for me, Norwegian equipment (=altered/modified/re-used/remade stuff) is a perfectly acceptable collectable variation, with a value attached to it.

Everything that has been done to 'undo' history on post war equipment no longer has my attention. But I specifically like the 'second life' that war time equipment had after 1945. That helps :)
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top