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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all, so I recently inherited a luger from my grandfather and tried to research it myself but I've hit a dead end and don't know where else to go. I have realized that the barrle and side plate are matching but from a different gun, but the biggest stump to me is it doesn't have a makers stamp which everything I look at uses to help idenitfy it, any info on the frame and or barrle would be greatly appreciated, because I want to know the history behind this gun I just dont know where to go with the search from here
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I'm seeing a Luger made up of parts from at least two different pistols. The barrel, receiver and side plate are from a first series Luger. The toggle train and frame are from a later year... at least 1913 as it has the stock lug that became standard in late 1913. If the frame has a hold open device that keeps the action open when the last shot is fired than that also dates to no earlier than 1913. Earlier Lugers were sometimes modified to have a hold open installed but yours wasn't as it isn't marked with a crown & letter on the side of the frame.

The maker, DWM, only marked the front toggle with their logo. The frames are not marked but it's easy to tell a DWM from an Erfurt as the Erfurt will have Crown/letters stamped on it. You have a nice looking Luger that is a "shooter". The mismatched parts removes it from the collectable category. It was an Imperial German military issue Luger.
 

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Thank-you! Is there anything else that can be told about this gun, like if it was military issuse or civilian or anything at all, and am I correct in saying that the barrle is not the original?
It appears that the barrel is not original to the frame, but the side plate, extractor, toggle, are. The take down lever also appears to not be original to the frame. The #27 on the back where the stock locks up is odd, i've never seen it. Also doesn't appear that the top is marked with a production year. Was your grandfather in ww II ? I'm curious
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It appears that the barrel is not original to the frame, but the side plate, extractor, toggle, are. The take down lever also appears to not be original to the frame. The #27 on the back where the stock locks up is odd, i've never seen it. Also doesn't appear that the top is marked with a production year. Was your grandfather in ww II ? I'm curious
I thought the barrle and takedown were not original, thanks for the help! And he was not, I'm a young guy so he would've only been 70 this year. He was a gun Smith so he has some oddities in the collection like this, and I was alloted all his guns when he died a few years ago and im just now going through his collection
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm seeing a Luger made up of parts from at least two different pistols. The barrel, receiver and side plate are from a first series Luger. The toggle train and frame are from a later year... at least 1913 as it has the stock lug that became standard in late 1913. If the frame has a hold open device that keeps the action open when the last shot is fired than that also dates to no earlier than 1913. Earlier Lugers were sometimes modified to have a hold open installed but yours wasn't as it isn't marked with a crown & letter on the side of the frame.

The maker, DWM, only marked the front toggle with their logo. The frames are not marked but it's easy to tell a DWM from an Erfurt as the Erfurt will have Crown/letters stamped on it. You have a nice looking Luger that is a "shooter". The mismatched parts removes it from the collectable category. It was an Imperial German military issue Luger.
Thank-you for the help! I thought it was a hodgepodge of two guns but I was not sure, and it does have a hold open, it's even the original! Although it seems like it was broken some time ago, and that is really cool to know it was a military issue gun, it only sucks that I will never know if it ever saw service or not!
 

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Welcome to the forum. We publish a FAQ document with quite a bit of reference information you will find useful. Search "FAQ PDF Update" and you'll hit the post with the PDF files.
 
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