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Hello Edward tinker and others who are experienced with the knowledge of these fantastic firearms. Less than two years ago I had some financial issues that came up and I had to sell all my Lugers . and now I’m looking to get some specific ones back. Instead of getting 3 to 6 varieties ,( missing my bollers barrel 1914 DWM, and my BYF 41)I’m wondering if I should look for a krieghoff that’s very nice . and one like a 1914 bollers barrel DWM that’s worn / matching as shooter , I love shooting these. I have only one now with a matching holster , magazine and 97% that is an 1936 S/42 . Thoughts and suggestions as they have gone up since I sold mine. Thanks Jim
 

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johnny ----- I'd suggest you look for a byf 42 with a 42 dated holster to go with your byf 41. These were the last two years lugers were produced for the German military. After that I'd look for a S/42 "G" (1935), a S/42 1937, a S/42 1938, a S/42 1939 and a 42 1940 dated pieces . You already have the S/42 1936 and the byf 41 pieces so you would have representative pieces of nearly all the Nazi era produced lugers. A "K" date (1934) luger would be very nice but finding one would be tough. I believe a collection of all lugers in the Nazi era could become VERY valuable in the near future.
 

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Thanks Left hand thunder, I believe you are 100 percent right, is a nice K less or more than a Krieghoff ? I’m going to start as they fall. Ideas where to look other than Gunbroker?
 

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Study, study - check prices and read up on assorted models. Something like a Krieghoff can be tricky and expensive, so I'd suggest a nice model that is not as expensive / desirable by long time collectors.
 

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I'm sure a nice K date and a nice Krieghoff could be equally expensive (big bucks), especially in today's market. Going on line and typing in "K date Lugers" and "Krieghoff Lugers" might bring up a source for them. Have patience, take your time and keep up the search. Things will make their appearance sometimes when least expected, at least that's what I've found.
 

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Many times, I've recommended that new collectors take the time, and make the investment to study at "Luger University" before investing money in hardware.

That is simply investing in some of the better new reference books, and reading them, plus taking the time to ask questions, and go to shows and see Lugers in hand instead of relying on photographs. It takes time to understand what the different finish states look like, and what looks "right" about different variations of Lugers.

The extremely expensive Lugers are often faked or "boosted" into their stratospheric prices. Some of the mechanics that do this have developed very high level skills and it can be difficult to detect their work in hand, and even worse in photographs (even good photos, much less those exchanged online).

This is only one reason it's often not wise to go straight to investing in high dollar Lugers when you start out. A $300 book may look expensive until you realize it can save you $1000 or more on a purchase.
 

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mrerick ---- That is very good advise for folks who are just getting into Luger collecting. I believe my luger collecting days are about over (except for the .45 caliber Luger I've recently ordered from LugerMan Inc. ) I know it is a replica but should be a very nice shootable one from what I've read and watched videos about them. I've wanted one since I first read about them 5 years ago. If I were just getting into lugers I'd sure take your advise and pick up several good books on todays market to educate myself. I have a number of Luger books that were published 30 and 40 years ago that I learned a lot from reading them. Keep on encourging the new guys in this crazy world to learn as much as they can about LUGERS.
 

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I'm somewhat suprised that folks are paying well over $1k for shooter grade 85% lugers. I suppose I'm just of the old school and think that way. However it could be a strong possibility that even the shooter grade pieces could fetch $2k + within a few years. I'm quite sure the .45 Luger I've just ordered could be worth two or three times the price I'm giving for it today within a year. I'm going to tell the young folks who will inhiert the piece to only accept silver or gold for it if they ever have to sell the luger.
 

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I think that the entire market moves the shooter grade pistols. A $650 pistol ten years ago would probably be $1200 today. Some move more than others, and collectible pieces move at different rates depending on the demand.

But when you get into the more rare Lugers like Krieghoff or Simson guns, or Navy pistols that can be manipulated things get much more expensive and research becomes more necessary. That research requires both background and judgement. The books like Sturgess and Goertz recent book go into extraordinary depth and are backed up with historic documentation.

A non-matching or finish challenged shooter grade Luger would require less authentication effort.

I bought an all matching shooter grade Simson Luger that had been improperly salt blued when it was refinished. The work was well done, and the work didn't destroy the pistol, only refinished it improperly in salt blue. It is the only Luger I have paid to have restored. I would never misrepresent it if I sold it, but it is my only Simson and I feel better that it has the correct appearance, even if it is no longer original. Is it collectible? It has zero original finish, but is is 100 percent matching and now rust blued and strawed. It's rarity (with only 12,000 in existence) keeps my interest...

Air gun Revolver Trigger Wood Gun barrel
 
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mrerick ---- A beautiful piece you have there. I feel the same way about the 1920 Navy Type I have that has been refinished and re-straw colored. But I on occasion shoot mine with my own ammo but I suppose you don't shoot your Simpson.
 
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