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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen, you have been very helpful in answering past questions for me no matter how trivial
I have one more, im aware that the marking before the rear sight
is a mil. exceptance stamp
but could you possibly i.d. the others for me?
here they are: firearm is in the 41,000 range all #s match:

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks JT
posted that one by accident the marks Im interested in are in the top 3 photos,especially the script A and the other
squigly thing in #1 and the other stamp in # 2 I think the stamp in #3 is the same ordnance mark that is on the top of slide
I may be wrong Im at a loss here but thanks for the input!
Jay
 

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Jay,
About 90 years ago there was the same problem to keep the quality on a high level as today. But there was a difference in the methods. Today we have the philosophy to check the process in each step because the influence of the worker is decreasing due to the automation. In past days the quality of a part lays in the hand of the worker with his machine tool and he was responsible for his operation.
To confirm the correct job, it was instructed that the worker has to marke his part. In your case it was I think a fitting operation.
This method is well documented particularly on Russian arms after the communist's revolution when the workers had to fear that their work could be classified as sabotage with the well known reaction (Sibiria). A look on a communist Nagant revolver will convince you.
But this is an other part of arm's history.
 
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