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Since my Mauser Banner article in Costanzo's World of Lugers that was published in 1977, I have been adding Banner serial numbers of those published in the article. I want to discuss the Swedish contract that is found between 6070w - 6350w. This is an interesting lot of pistols because a few were dated 1939 and the remainder were dated 1940. Oddly enough all are Eagle N nitro proofed. And, yes, that includes those dated 1939. That is rather odd because the E/N proof did not appear until January 15, 1940, and that proof was mandated by the Proofing Commission for all German proof-houses in Germany. This indicates some remaining 1939 dated receivers were used to fill this contract. The 1939 dated examples are found between 6070w - 6100w and contain about 25 to 30 pistols. 6100w - 6350w are the examples dated 1940 and also have the Eagle N proofs. That would amount to about 250 examples of the 1940 dated Lugers. Added together we have about 275 - 280 pistols in this contract. Note also that all of these pistols have strawed small parts also. Later is found another Swedish contract is found between 6676w - 6800w. As noted, these Lugers are all in 7,65mm caliber. Regards, Jim Cate
 

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I have a Mauser commercial sn 56xx in the "v" block that is in .30 Luger. It is built on a 1938 dated slide, and is rust blued and has strawed small parts. It is Crown/U proofed.

Joop's book isn't specific about a contract associated with a commercial in this block.

I suspect that older parts set aside for some reason in the factory got used in these commercial contracts, which could explain why they appear at a later date.
 

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Since my Mauser Banner article in Costanzo's World of Lugers that was published in 1977, I have been adding Banner serial numbers of those published in the article. I want to discuss the Swedish contract that is found between 6070w - 6350w. This is an interesting lot of pistols because a few were dated 1939 and the remainder were dated 1940. Oddly enough all are Eagle N nitro proofed. And, yes, that includes those dated 1939. That is rather odd because the E/N proof did not appear until January 15, 1940, and that proof was mandated by the Proofing Commission for all German proof-houses in Germany. This indicates some remaining 1939 dated receivers were used to fill this contract. The 1939 dated examples are found between 6070w - 6100w and contain about 25 to 30 pistols. 6100w - 6350w are the examples dated 1940 and also have the Eagle N proofs. That would amount to about 250 examples of the 1940 dated Lugers. Added together we have about 275 - 280 pistols in this contract. Note also that all of these pistols have strawed small parts also. Later is found another Swedish contract is found between 6676w - 6800w. As noted, these Lugers are all in 7,65mm caliber. Regards, Jim Cate
Hi Jim:
Your post was very timely, I just bought 1939 6076w!
I also see 6057w and 6081w at Simpson among others. It seems the eagle-N is on its side on this batch, later are horizontal.
This is really new to me-I had thought the Swedish contract was marked "Kal 7.65" on the barrel and the eagle-N came into use April 1, 1940, thank you.
Cheers, Joe Shray
 

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Since my earlier post this morning I have looked around the internet a bit more and, apologies, I am a little confused on the nomenclature describing Swedish Banner Lugers such as "Swedish Test Luger", "Swedish Commercial Luger" and "Swedish Contract Luger"...perhaps some overlap in meaning.

If you haven't seen it yet, below is a short video on the Swedish Test Luger that mentions 25 made in 7.65 with short barrels such as my 1939 number 6076w photos above. Is my 1939 pistol one of those 25 military test pistols or are those military test pistols dated 1938 as the long barrel 9mm in the video?
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Best Wishes, Joe

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Joe, thanks for your reply and the serial numbers that I will add to my database. Nope! April 1, 1940 is not the date the E/N proof was first used. It has definitely been proven by several German documents and archive data the 'new' proof began being used on January 15, 1940 in ALL German proof-houses. The German Proofing Commission finalized all rules and procedures of the new proof on April 1, 1940. That action's date is what has caused many writers and authors to print the E/N information in error for many years. Stay well, Jim
 

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I have a Mauser commercial sn 56xx in the "v" block that is in .30 Luger. It is built on a 1938 dated slide, and is rust blued and has strawed small parts. It is Crown/U proofed. Joop's book isn't specific about a contract associated with a commercial in this block. I suspect that older parts set aside for some reason in the factory got used in these commercial contracts, which could explain why they appear at a later date.
According to Gortz & Sturgess, 1942 commercial Lugers were exported in 1937 ~ 1938. They do not indicate which countries they went to but they do mention that small quantities went to Sweden and Switzerland.

Sweden purchased 300 Mauser Banner Lugers for testing and they were built on 1938 dated receivers in the "approximate" 5700v ~ 6000v serial number range. They have 120mm barrels and about 30 of them were in 7.65mm. The one they show pictures of has straw parts and is numbered as a military pistol would be.They are commercially proved and the Mauser Banner is the late large 8 stave barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, that is true as best as we can tell presently. Remember the 1938 pistols were in the 'v' suffix range and not the 'w' range of pistols that followed later. It is easy to confuse the suffix if not paid attention to. Regards, Jim
 

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Doubs,
I did contact Joop about mine before he passed, and it does conform to the Swedish contract pistols. It's likely that it is one of the early ones, but it is just ahead of the serial range he quoted in the book.

The only way to be sure would be to see paperwork from the Mauser business archives that documented the contracts involved. Certainly there would have been early "test" pistols for examination by the customer within the Swedish military.

It is a very interesting Luger pistol.
 

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Doubs, I did contact Joop about mine before he passed, and it does conform to the Swedish contract pistols. It's likely that it is one of the early ones, but it is just ahead of the serial range he quoted in the book. The only way to be sure would be to see paperwork from the Mauser business archives that documented the contracts involved. Certainly there would have been early "test" pistols for examination by the customer within the Swedish military. It is a very interesting Luger pistol.
Depending upon the last two digits of your Luger, it may well have been one of the Swedish test guns. G&S does say that the serial number range they provide is "approximate".

The picture in G&S shows a beautifully made pistol with the rust blue and strawed parts and the 120mm barrel is perfect IMO. I have a Luger with a .30 caliber barrel that's 6 inches long and it's one of my favorite shooters.
 

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Thank you all for the info, whether my pistol 6076w was meant for commercial sales in Sweden, Germany or elsewhere it is still very interesting. Office supplies Cylinder Auto part Rim Electronic device
Cylinder Composite material Metal Rectangle Electric blue


I do have another question please.

My pistol 6076w arrived yesterday and I took a quick look at it---it struck me odd that the front-facing surface of the muzzle is blued not white. (I do not suspect the pistol is refinished.)

I will attach a couple photos of two other pistols, a 1939 that is blue and a 1942 that looks white.

Please enlighten me, should the muzzle be white or blued?

Thank you, Joe.
 

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I have seen something similar on another unusual commercial Mauser Luger. Parts that you'd expect to be in the white are blued.

I'm not sure if any records exist on how the factory prepared parts for and manufactured the commercial guns during the periods when they were delivering the large military orders. Thus I can only speculate.

First, look over the pistol for any evidence of rounding of normally crisp edges (including die digits). They should all be sharp on an original finish Luger. Check the witness mark at the barrel's base and the receiver.

I can't tell from your photos whether your pistol is rust blued or salt blued. After about April 1937, Mauser Lugers were salt blued - with blued small parts. My 1938 Commercial in the "v" block appears rust blued, and still has strawed parts.

My 1942 commercial was salt blued, and it has blued parts that you'd normally find in the white - yet is is factory crisp and original. I suspect that the gun was made from widely varying batches of parts, and then blued to make the bluing uniform. This may have been done with your gun. At the time when high volumes of military contract Lugers were flowing through the factory, these commercial orders would have been processed separately in small batches.

While Mauser was surely making high volumes of 9mm Luger barrels at the time your pistol was made, they may have been working from an older batch of .30 Luger barrels for these commercial contracts. It's even possible that the .30 Luger barrels were stock brought from Berlin when Luger production moved to Oberndorf. When they were finally assembled into pistols, their finish would look different than the other parts, but their crown would be final shaped and finished. Mauser would want to deliver a good looking uniformly finished pistol to commercial customers.

Of course, without factory documentation, this is all speculation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Joe, I don't have an answer for you. Perhaps the 7,65mm barrels were blued (including the muzzle) before being utilized in that particular contract. There are known Mausers with salt blued barrels and the rest of the pistol is rust blued. You can bet Mauser was not wasting anything in 1939/40 in the production of their Lugers. JIM
 

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Thank you again, my pistol 6076w is rust blued-perhaps the contrast in the original photos posted above make it look salt blued, also no sign of refinish/blurred markings. With the background check backlog it will be a week before I can pick up the pistol.

I do think the blue muzzle is original, I have seen others online such as 6057w above and here are a couple photos of 1942 dated 7567w.

Best Wishes, Joe Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Wood
Revolver Air gun Trigger Line Gun barrel
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Joe, thanks for your reply and the serial numbers that I will add to my database. Nope! April 1, 1940 is not the date the E/N proof was first used. It has definitely been proven by several German documents and archive data the 'new' proof began being used on January 15, 1940 in ALL German proof-houses. The German Proofing Commission finalized all rules and procedures of the new proof on April 1, 1940. That action's date is what has caused many writers and authors to print the E/N information in error for many years. Stay well, Jim
I recently purchased Mauser banner 6705, 1940 Eagle N proofed in 7.65. Is there a registry I can add to and anywhere to look to find matching magazines? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Joe, you failed to give me the suffix under the serial number of your new Luger. Is it a 'w'? If so, get back in touch with me and I can give you some more info about my database of Mauser Banner Lugers. OK? Thanks, JIM
 
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