Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for help in trying to identify a Mauser HSc in my collection. No ser# on the front grip strap just a series of shallow, uneven dashes --- where the ser # should be. There doesn't appear to be any removal of the numbers as the area shows no evidence of grinding or shaving. Apon taking down the pistol a #7 can be seen on the slide at the muzzle, under where the barrel protrudes from the slide. There is also a #7 on the frame in the well in front of and at the top of the trigger guard where the barrel and slide sit on the frame. Both #7's appear to be the same size and font. Nothing but the RW inspectors mark on the barrel. This RW mark is also on the frame and slide but not on the outside of the pistol. Wood grips with center grip screw. Eagle N proof on the slide in its normal place but none on the barrel or frame. The slide legend is without the three lines. I think its an early type. No markings on the mag. The sight channel is not matted but smooth like the side of the slide. No lanyard loop at the butt. No markings associated with post WW2 French manufacture. Slide 95% mil blue, trigger is a blackish blue and the frame appears poorly blued with maybe 80% remaining. Someone told me this could be a lunchbox pistol smuggled out of the factory piece by piece. I don't buy this theory because there would be no need to number the major parts and would actually make the parts more easy to trace if the employee was caught with parts. In addition the pistol is very tight and completely functionable. Not what I would expect from a pistol being assembled from parts without any expert hand fitting or fine tune adjustments. Any and all information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
quote:Originally posted by jekel

I'm looking for help in trying to identify a Mauser HSc in my collection. No ser# on the front grip strap just a series of shallow, uneven dashes --- where the ser # should be. There doesn't appear to be any removal of the numbers as the area shows no evidence of grinding or shaving. Apon taking down the pistol a #7 can be seen on the slide at the muzzle, under where the barrel protrudes from the slide. There is also a #7 on the frame in the well in front of and at the top of the trigger guard where the barrel and slide sit on the frame. Both #7's appear to be the same size and font. Nothing but the RW inspectors mark on the barrel. This RW mark is also on the frame and slide but not on the outside of the pistol. Wood grips with center grip screw. Eagle N proof on the slide in its normal place but none on the barrel or frame. The slide legend is without the three lines. I think its an early type. No markings on the mag. The sight channel is not matted but smooth like the side of the slide. No lanyard loop at the butt. No markings associated with post WW2 French manufacture. Slide 95% mil blue, trigger is a blackish blue and the frame appears poorly blued with maybe 80% remaining. Someone told me this could be a lunchbox pistol smuggled out of the factory piece by piece. I don't buy this theory because there would be no need to number the major parts and would actually make the parts more easy to trace if the employee was caught with parts. In addition the pistol is very tight and completely functionable. Not what I would expect from a pistol being assembled from parts without any expert hand fitting or fine tune adjustments. Any and all information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Download Attachment: 498.jpg
20.33KB

Download Attachment: 501.jpg
20.66KB

Download Attachment: 503.jpg
20.03KB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Jekel:
Thanks for posting the photos. We can rule it out as a prototype since the grip screw location and Mauser slide legend are consistent with regular HSc production. Of interest is that the pistol has a series of dashes where the serial number should be. A lunch box pistol wouldn't have anything...such as with Mark's pistol. Even more interesting is the stamped 7 under the muzzle which would have required a special jig, instead of the usual electropenciling. Could this possibly be some early French activity before they resumed production/assembly at the factory in 1945/46? Hopefully others on this forum can shed more light.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top