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Newly inherited - grandfather brought back from Eur. theater WWII. Mauser Schnellfeuer, Serial no. 13072 (matching numbers in appropriate spots on firearm). Mauser logo stamped on left, Waffen Fabrik Mauser Oberndorf a. Neckar D.R.P.u.A.P on right. Stamped markings on barrel as seen in pictures. Original wooden holster/stock (Mauser stamped), original leather holster, 10 and 20 shot clips (both Mauser stamped). Has not be redone in any way - brought back WWII in this condition.

I have read that there is very little information that survived, etc., after the war, but I am looking for what you, as experts, might have to offer me in the way of information about this firearm.

Many thanks!
 

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Beautiful rig, especially the leather carrier. Your pistol is early in the Mod 712 production, probably 1933-34, but this is a guess. There are pictures around of German soldiers with these during WWII, supposedly SS, but I don't know any reason why other German units would not have access to them as well. I own two. One a mint gun that came back from China after WWII, the other a mint rig imported from Denmark in the 1980s for class 3 sales. Cool guns, just don't be tempted to shoot it without the stock, that gets 'interesting'.
Mike
 

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i bought a m712 on gunbroker last month. i own 2 ,c96s they have wood stocks. what questions would i need to ask to determine if a stock listed on gb would fit a m712 (measurements ) how does a c96 differ from a m712 in size? hope this makes sense
 

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The stocks for m712 were milled inside for the selector switch clearance.
Also, probably with additional channels milled inside for the magazine floorplate to slide in and out of the stock..
so their is no difference in the over all size of the stock. you wouldnt have a pic of the inside of a m712. stock or where i might fine one
 

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Typical Schnellfeuer stock is similar to M1930 stock, with three differences.

(1) It is slightly fatter exteriorly. The body is about 3m/m wider, so it gives viewers a "rounder" look and feel. Especially when it's put side by side with a M1930 stock.
(2) The inside of the body has cutout for the firing control switch, the interior size is also slightly larger.
(3) The tension spring inside the lid is in slightly different style.

Plain Schnellfeuer stock with no cracks can easily go $1200 on ebay. Nice ones are rarely seen (well, at least, rarely for sale). It's collected internationally. I don't have a Schnellfeuer, because it's against local law. So I got a stock, the stock alone, is legal here. Many places are tight on guns, but have an open attitude on stocks.
 

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Regarding production Schnellfeuer sub-variations, first comes Nickl Schnellfuer. Nickl's production volume was small and probably had no sub-variations. After Nickl was Westinger. A few sub-variations exist. This one was 1st style Westinger, then, the firing control switch was slightly simplified, then, the milling slot on the rail was cancelled, then, the barrel length went 140m/m, and finally barrel s/n was relocated. But that's split hair difference. On high level, there were only two variations, Nickl and Westinger.
 

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thanks, may have to settle for a repo. i was checking my c96 9mm and discovered it to have a matching stock. it came with the leather holster also.bought it on gb several years ago,grips are not marked with a branded red 9 though .they do match the guns serial num.
 

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This reblued gun, #821244, is a typical M1930. The stock is, as mouser said,
a modern replication. The provenance of this gun was most likely from China
in 1980s. Please note the "MP" inside a oval circle stamp, that stamp was
not fake, I saw same stamp on the same location on samples in Chinese
museum. The meaning of "MP" is unknown, most likely, "Military Police".
In 1940s, nationalist military system was under strong U.S. influence,
stamping some existing guns with English abbreviation must be very
fashionable.
 
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