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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Randall Gibson, in his Krieghoff Lugers, describes a manufacturing difference of Mauser made lugers, with a hole at the upper part of the side groove (page 29). I just acquired a G date piece. It has NO hole on either side of the stocklug groove. I have noted from my limited experience, that all Mauser lugers, starting with the second variation of 1937, have not only the hole but the Mauser "hump" and the new bluing method where all the previously strawed parts are blued. Did the holes begin appearing when the "hump" began to appear? If so, could there be some connection between them with the manufacturing process. Has anyone observed the hole without the "hump" and conversely the "hump" without the hole? Would certainly like to see feedback as we examine those Mauser P08's.
 

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Hi Doc, just a reminder that some K-Dates have the Mauser "Hump".

I checked a few of my 1937's and confirm my "all blue" models have the hole and my "straw" models do not.

Since the 1934 "hump" seems to be a trial, some have them and some do not. It could still be a tooling technique or a process (blue) addition or both, beginning with the mid 1937 changes!!

There are some 1937's that have both the "hump" and strawed small parts. Unfortunately, I don't have any of these. Any data from this group may or may not be conclusive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Frank for your valuable input. I have not been fortunate so see many "K" variants, but I will keep my eyes open. I was postulating that the stocklug hole and the hump always existed together possibly indicating they both were integral in the manufacturing process, but I guess this is only a WAG! Obviously needs much more data to support. To muddy the waters further, my "41" commercial Mauser banner, has strawed parts AND the hump.
 
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Mauser didn't waste any parts. I believe the hole is only present in those frames that were actually made by Mauser. Chances are your G-Date frame was a DWM frame that came to Mauser in 1930. Fact is, a very few production G-S/42 Lugers had the DWM logo on the toggle. - For what it's worth. - I was told many years ago that Mauser continued producing Lugers with the stock lug on the frame because it was easier to hold the part in the milling machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very interesting speculation, Silvereagle29. I didn't entertain the possibility that frames without the stock lug hole could have been DWM leftovers. Also, I don't think I have ever seen a "G" date with a DWM logo on the toggle, at least one that was thought to be original.
 
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drbuster
I have seen about four G-S/42 pistols with the DWM toggle train. Unfortunately, the last one observed was before I started recording serial number and suffix data on Mauser Lugers. I believe that the acceptance marks may be the convincing issue. if the pistol had a B-90 S-91 or B-90 S-92 marked frame, chances are it would be correct. Bill Drollinger had one for sale about twenty years ago, If he watches these discussions he may be able to shed some light on this subject. Good Luck and good hunting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very interesting Lougerlou! I guess anything is possible. And Don, I will keep my eyes open for "G" dates with DWM toggles. If I find one I will certainly let you know for your database.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don, Just another thought. Do "K" date lugers exist with DWM toggle trains? One might think so if "G" date ones exist as "K" dates were earlier and presumbaly Mauser had more DWM frames in their possession. I have never seen a "K" date with such a toggle train but I await your thoughts.
 
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